Ta’leem 2016 to open with France as guest of honor

Updated 12 April 2016

Ta’leem 2016 to open with France as guest of honor

RIYADH: Under the patronage of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman, the fifth annual Saudi International Exhibition and Forum for Education (Ta’leem 2016) will kick off Tuesday night with France as the guest of honor country.
The three-day event will be launched at the Riyadh International Exhibition and Conference Center at King Abdullah Road here, under the theme “investment in education.”
Around 250 exhibitors from the Kingdom and 25 other countries are participating in the event comprising an exhibition and a forum.
Prominent speakers from both the Kingdom and foreign countries are contributing to the forum.
On choosing France as guest of honor country for this year’s edition of the exhibition and conference, Minister of Education Ahmad Al-Issa said earlier that France is a friendly advanced country in education and educational investment that getting more attention from Saudi education officials as well as from Saudis citizens who are interested in pursuing further studies there, whether on government scholarships or on their own means.
French Ambassador to the Kingdom Bertrand Besancenot told Arab News in exclusive statements that he and his country are very grateful to the Kingdom for selecting France as guest of honor at Ta’leem 2016.
“This is very significant step as France has been a long-time friend of Saudi Arabia, as well as one of the best allies and partners of the Kingdom. Since 2015, we have set up a special Franco-Saudi committee that meets on a regular basis that helps our cooperation move forward in all fields and in the field of education in particular,” he said.
“When Prince Khaled bin Faisal started to reform the education system in 2014, France was one of the first countries to offer support, since we believe progress begins with a modern education system that meets society’s needs,” he added.
Besancenot stressed that Saudi society faces two main challenges today. The first is the “Saudization” of the labor market, which requires a more efficient training and vocational system to fit business needs. And the second is the fight against terrorism and religious extremism, which requires redesigning some education programs.
On his country’s contribution to Ta’leem 2016, he mentioned that France will display a wide range of expertise on how to invest successfully in education through modern facilities (e.g. high tech nurseries, primary and secondary schools, connected campuses, etc.) and vocational training institutions (e.g. technical high schools, technological institutes).
“Many French governmental institutions will attend the event, notably the Ministry of Education and Scientific Research, the Académie of Paris (the local administration in charge of implementing the national education policy for Paris), Campus France (the national agency for the promotion of higher education), the CREDIJ (the “French TVTC”) and some cutting-edge private universities and “grandes écoles,” he said.
“There will also be French companies specialized in education, including start-ups with high development potential in Saudi Arabia. The aim of the French pavilion will be to provide a large number of education advisers and specialists to explain and show how education reform has been dealt with in France. That could be a source of inspiration for Saudi Arabia in its own short- and long-term reforms,” he added.


G20 ready to limit effects of coronavirus on global economy, Saudi finance minister

Updated 23 February 2020

G20 ready to limit effects of coronavirus on global economy, Saudi finance minister

  • G20 will continue to take joint action to strengthen international co-operation and frameworks
  • Finance ministers agree measures to tackle global problems, coronavirus

RIYADH: The meeting of G20 finance ministers and central bank governors ended in Saudi Arabia with a determination to tackle pressing global concerns such as geopolitical and trade confrontations, as well as the challenge of the coronavirus outbreak.
The official communique — hammered out among the G20 policy-makers gathered in Riyadh over two days of discussions — said that global economic growth was expected to pick up “modestly” this year and next, on signs of improving financial conditions and some signs of easing trade tensions.
“However, global economic growth remains slow, and downside risks to the outlook persist, inching those arising from geopolitical and remaining trade tensions, and policy uncertainty. We will enhance global risk monitoring, including the recent outbreak of COVID-19 (coronavirus). We stand ready to take further action to address those risks,” the communique said.

On so-called “trade wars” between the US and China — which was not represented at the Riyadh meeting because of the outbreak — the communiqué said: “We will continue to take joint action to strengthen international co-operation and frameworks, and also reaffirm our commitments on exchange rates.”
There was general agreement by the ministers on measures on infrastructure investment, technology development, and plans to boost domestic capital markets across the world, especially in emerging and developing countries.
But a note of caution was also sounded in several areas.The G20 finance ministers said that “we are facing a global landscape that is being rapidly transformed by economic, social, environmental, technological and demographic changes.”
Apart from that mention of the environment, there was little attention given to the contentious issue of climate change. Towards the end of the communique, the ministers and governors said: “The financial stability board (of the G20) is examining the financial stability implications of climate change.”
The finance ministers’ gathering is the first formal event in preparation for the summit of world leaders that will take place in Saudi Arabia in November, with the three key aims of empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers in technology and innovation.
The international taxation system was an area of focus at the finance ministers meeting, with some countries threatening a controversial digital tax. The communique said that “we continue to support tax capacity building in developing countries,” and called on all countries to sign multilateral agreements on tax matters. “We remain committed to the full, timely and consistent implementation of the agreed financial reforms,” it added.
Other big themes of the financial G20 meeting included inclusion of youth and women in the financial process. “We support the emphasis on digital financial inclusion of under-served groups, especially youth, women and small businesses,” the communique said.
There was also strong support for the work of the global Financial Action Task Force in combating money laundering and terrorism finance. “We reiterate our strong commitment to tackle all sources, techniques and channels of these threats,” the G20 ministers said, also backing measures to tackle the financing of nuclear proliferation. “We ask the FATF to remain vigilant with respect to emerging financial technologies that may allow for new methods of illicit financing,” it added.