60% of unemployed Saudis hold degrees

Updated 14 April 2016

60% of unemployed Saudis hold degrees

RIYADH: Sixty percent of those unemployed in the Kingdom hold diplomas and bachelor’s degrees, said Dr. Saleh Al-Amro, undersecretary of the Ministry of Economy and Planning for Human and Community Development Affairs, noting that this reflects the gap between education and training institutions.
He said the need for citizens in various sectors will continue to rise in the coming years, especially in the health sector, which will provide approximately 238,000 job opportunities for Saudis in the coming years. This underlines the need to increase the number of graduates with diplomas, he said, expecting that the number of graduates with bachelor’s degrees will decline.
He said privatization of the education sector is complex, noting that the state spends about 25 percent of total government spending on the sector, or about 6 percent of GDP, amounts he described as “generous” as compared to other developed countries.
During his discussion on “Privatization and its impact on Education … Challenges and Opportunities” within the activities of the third day of the International Exhibition and Forum for Education in Riyadh on Wednesday, Al-Amro explained that privatization must be done in stages, by changing the infrastructure, building the capacity of management and governance capabilities, and making improvements to create transparency in the education and training system.
For his part, Dr. Osama Al-Heizan, supervisor of the project of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques for the development of public education, called for turning challenges into opportunities, which is required sooner rather than later by the ministry and the private sector, especially with the current movement toward accelerating privatization programs in the state, and initiatives of the national transformation program.
He confirmed the presence of two schools, out of a number of schools, in this strategic thought that explain this relationship, noting that challenges they face include the legislative environment, and legal and regulatory requirements.


Abdullah bin Mufreh Al-Dhayabi, president of Tabuk University

Updated 11 December 2019

Abdullah bin Mufreh Al-Dhayabi, president of Tabuk University

  • Al-Dhayabi began his academic career as a lecturer at KAU
  • Al-Dhayabi is a member of the higher committees for female colleges in the Kingdom

RIYADH: Dr. Abdullah bin Mufreh Al-Dhayabi has been the president of Tabuk University since October 2017.

Prior to that, he was the deputy head of educational affairs at King Abdul Aziz University (KAU) in Jeddah, where he served in the position for one year. 

He has also been the chairman of the promotion and job competition committee, as well as the safety committee, at Tabuk University since November 2012. 

Al-Dhayabi began his academic career as a lecturer at KAU, where he received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the College of Science. 

He later traveled abroad to pursue his higher education, earning his master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Missouri, US. He obtained his doctorate from the University of Birmingham, UK.

After that, he returned to the Kingdom and joined KAU as an assistant professor. He remained in that position from 2005 to 2010, then served as an associate professor between 2010 and 2014.

Al-Dhayabi is a member of the higher committees for female colleges in the Kingdom and the community colleges higher committee at the Ministry of Higher Education.

He congratulated King Salman on the release of the government’s annual budget for 2020.

“Approximately one-fifth of the budget is allocated to education, which reflects the leadership’s keenness to invest in the human element through education and training ... to open new horizons and job opportunities for Saudi youth and encourage them to invest in the diverse resources in the Kingdom,” Al-Dhayabi said.