Showing results for "Shoura Council"

Warming Iran-Taliban ties will have consequences for region

  • On a hot day in August 1998, the Taliban conquered Mazar-e-Sharif, the holy city believed by some to be the final resting place of Caliph Ali bin Abi Taleb. The conquest was described as a frenzied takeover, as Taliban fighters shot at “anything that moved,” killing hundreds of Hazara Shiites, ...
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Iraq steps slowly back into the Arab fold

  • As a founding member of the Arab League and bastion of Arab nationalism, Iraq has traditionally held great sway in regional politics. Its over-involvement in regional affairs under Saddam Hussein, however, has been replaced by its near disappearance since 2003. The government, led by Prime Min...
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Arab world at the forefront of climate change ‘code red’

  • Last week the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued a climate change “code red.” Human activity is changing the climate in unprecedented and sometimes irreversible ways. The warning was unequivocal: A key global temperature limit has been broken, and humanity can expect a continue...
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‘Twin brothers’ Morocco and Algeria may finally be reunited

  • The annual Throne Day speech in Morocco is always an important barometer of Moroccan policy, both domestic and international. Moroccans are accustomed to its content, such as how the country is dealing with societal changes, developmental challenges, building partnerships overseas and, of cours...
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Tunisia’s president steps in due to Ennahda’s failings

  • The last time protesters amassed along Habib Bourguiba Avenue in Tunis, Tunisia was in the throes of a revolution that unseated strongman Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali and dismantled his fearsome police state. Last weekend, as people gathered in front of parliament, dissatisfaction with the ruling En...
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Tunisia’s COVID-19 crisis a warning for the region

  • In the tumultuous decade following the so-called Arab Spring, one of the few glimmers of hope was Tunisia’s fledgling democracy, in which the aspirations of the many had supplanted the decrepit kleptocracy of the few. The developmental challenges that picked apart the “ancien regime” have, howe...
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History repeating itself as Western troops leave Afghanistan

  • In 1842, four years after invading in formidable numbers and to great fanfare, an entire British army retreating from Afghanistan to India was massacred. Its worthy Afghan foes, with an eye on history and taunting any would-be invader, allowed one military surgeon, Dr. William Brydon, to surviv...
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What Raisi presidency will mean for Iran’s regional rivals

  • Iran’s Guardian Council disqualified all but seven of last month’s 592 presidential hopefuls — including the country’s longest-serving parliamentary speaker, a vice president and a former president — in the most extreme interference by a supreme leader in the electoral process. After a disast...
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NATO’s future unclear despite Biden’s ‘America is back’ vow

  • President Joe Biden’s first international trip was much anticipated in terms of him outlining his vision for US foreign policy in any real detail for the first time since the campaign trail. Sandwiched between the meeting of the G7 in the UK and a US-EU summit in Brussels, Biden attended the NA...
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NFTs transforming the collectible art market

  • The One-Cent Magenta from British Guiana, the world’s most valuable stamp, was last week bought for $8.3 million by Stanley Gibbons, the oldest stamp dealer in the world. Having been issued temporarily in 1856 by a local postmaster at a time when the colony was cut off from London, the stamps a...
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