Respect religions, marchers in Philippines tell Charlie Hebdo

Updated 14 January 2015

Respect religions, marchers in Philippines tell Charlie Hebdo

MANILA: Around 1,500 people protested in one of the Philippines’ cities on Wednesday against the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, police said.
Local politicians, teenaged students and women with veils covering their faces packed the main square in Marawi in the southern Philippines, some raising their fists in the air as a Charlie Hebdo poster was burned.
“What had happened in France, the Charlie Hebdo killing, is a moral lesson for the world to respect any kind of religion, especially the religion of Islam,” organizers said in a statement released during the three-hour rally.
“Freedom of expression does not extend to insulting the noble and the greatest Prophet of Allah.”
A group calling itself “Boses ng Masa,” or Voice of the Masses organized the rally, which attracted about 1,500 people, Marawi police officer Esmail Biso told AFP.
He said non-government organizations behind the group.
Twelve people including eight Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and journalists and two police officers were killed last week after militants struck the magazine’s Paris office, in an attack that has sparked outrage worldwide.
The attacks triggered giant rallies in support of Charlie Hebdo’s victims and the right to publish images of reverent figures.
The protest in the Philippines was one of first reported worldwide since the violence to express outrage at Charlie Hebdo.
The protesters carried streamers in with the words “You are Charlie” written in French, in response to the “I am Charlie” cry of those who condemned the attack.
One of the streamers read: “France must apologize,” while another read: “You mock our prophet, now you want an apology?”
Muslims are a minority in the Philippines, with most living in remote southern regions they regard as their ancestral homeland.


US will not lift sanctions to negotiate with Iran

Updated 51 min 58 sec ago

US will not lift sanctions to negotiate with Iran

  • Zarif said Iran is still open to negotiations with US if sanctions are lifted
  • Tensions between the two have been increasing steadily since Trump pulled the United States out of Iran’s nuclear pact

DUBAI: The United States will not lift sanctions on Iran in order to negotiate, US President Donald Trump tweeted late on Saturday, seemingly in response to a Der Spiegel interview with Iran’s foreign minister.
“Iranian Foreign Minister says Iran wants to negotiate with The United States, but wants sanctions removed. @FoxNews @OANN No Thanks!” Trump tweeted in English on Saturday and later in Farsi.
Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif responded on Sunday by tweeting an excerpt from the interview with Der Spiegel published on Friday, where he said Iran is still open to negotiations with America if sanctions are lifted.
“@realdonaldtrump is better advised to base his foreign policy comments & decisions on facts, rather than @FoxNews headlines or his Farsi translators,” Zarif said in the tweet with the interview excerpt.
Tensions between Iran and the United States have reached the highest levels in decades after the US killed top Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in a drone strike in Baghdad on Jan. 3, prompting Iran to fire missiles days later at bases in Iraq where US troops are stationed.
Tensions between the two have been increasing steadily since Trump pulled the United States out of Iran’s nuclear pact with world powers in 2018 and reimposed sanctions that have driven down Iran’s oil exports and hammered its economy.