As MH370 compensation issue flies high

Updated 13 March 2015

As MH370 compensation issue flies high

1. THE MISSING COMPENSATION: No payment yet; no promise to compensate to families of the passengers of the Malaysian plane that went missing on March 8, 2014.
2. INTERIM PAYMENT: The Malaysian Airlines (MAS) has decided to give out $50,000 as initial payment only, pending a final decision.
3. FULL PAYMENT: Families wait for a final settlement, despite Kuala Lumpur announcing the incident as accident. Patience pays.
4. MONTREAL CONVENTION: The 1999 protocol specifies that each family of the plane crash victims is entitled to $176,000 (approx.). No payment is as big as the loss.
5. PRECEDENT: TransAsia Flight GE222 accident in July 2014, when next-of-kin were offered $473,000 for each person killed in the accident in Taiwan.
6. BEING HONEST ANYWAY: In January, MAS declared the plane’s disappearance an accident, clearing the way for compensation to victims’ relatives, while the search for the jet will go on
7. KEY EVIDENCE: The disclosure that a beacon battery in the flight data recorder of the plane had expired makes the case stronger against MAS.
8. VOICE370: This NGO is spearheading the compensation drive while the families refuse to accept the theory that the passengers are dead.
9. BITTER TRUTH: International search to find the plane is on, but officials confirmed the 239 people onboard are now presumed dead. Hard luck.
10. A WAKING DREAM: The families refusing the offer only to hold out hope that the passengers might still be alive. Wish they are true!

10 Things: The other side of the story
1. Mystery of the plane’s disappearance is still unresolved; final compensation only after the issue comes to any conclusion, this is what Malaysia deputy transport minister recently said.
2. MAS however says it is in the process of providing full compensation payouts to the relatives.
3. CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya too has said that following the declaration of accident, the airline could now make full payment.
4. While Malaysia commits to resolve the issue, it says priority is on searching the plane.
5. Families not ready to accept the theory that the passengers are dead. Why then the bodies like Voice370 rake up the compensation issue now?
6. MAS has already resolved to give out $50,000 as initial aid.
7. Seven families are reported to have accepted interim payment in January.
8. The families have been asked to provide proof of their relationship and the losses, as part of the payment process. Then why the fuss?
9. MAS provided counselling and established family assistance centers in Malaysia and Beijing in addition to providing information updates twice a day by email, regular phone calls and daily briefings in the early days after the disappearance of MH370.
10. The airlines also underwrote all travel and accommodation expenses for family members in Beijing and Kuala Lumpur, engaged special security forces to protect the safety and privacy of families and provided meal vouchers and financial assistance of US$5,000 per family.


AstraZeneca still waiting for FDA decision to resume US trial

Updated 8 min 40 sec ago

AstraZeneca still waiting for FDA decision to resume US trial

  • AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine was initially developed by the University of Oxford

FRANKFURT: AstraZeneca is still waiting for the go-ahead from the US drug regulator to restart the clinical trial of its potential COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, Chief Executive Pascal Soriot said on Thursday.
“We are the sponsor of the US study. We then provided all this information to the FDA (US Federal Drug Administration) and we are waiting to hear their decision,” Soriot told a virtual World Economic Forum discussion.
The US trial of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate, initially developed by the University of Oxford, remains on hold while regulators investigate an illness in one of the participants, even after a British study and other programs outside of the United States have resumed.
US Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said on Wednesday the continued suspension showed the FDA took vaccine safety seriously.
A document posted online by Oxford university last week stated the illness in a British participant that triggered the pause on Sept. 6 may not have been associated with the vaccine.