Bush Sr. lashes out at Cheney and Rumsfeld

Updated 05 November 2015

Bush Sr. lashes out at Cheney and Rumsfeld

WASHINGTON: Former President George H.W. Bush has reportedly lashed out at Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld, two key figures in his son George W. Bush’s presidency in a forthcoming book.
Bush, president from 1989-1993, has mostly been silent on issues regarding his son’s presidency and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
But in an upcoming biography, he has some choice words for the two men who played a pivotal role in George W.’s 2001-2009 White House.
Former vice president Cheney built “his own empire” and had too much of a “hard-line” over his son in convincing him to use military force around the world, Bush said, according to The New York Times on Thursday, citing the former president’s biographer Jon Meacham.
And former Defense Secretary Rumsfeld was an “arrogant fellow,” blind to the opinions of others, who “served the president badly,” Bush said.
Bush knows Cheney well, as the latter was his secretary of defense during the 1991 Operation Desert Storm, the US-led military push that liberated Kuwait from Saddam Hussein’s Iraqi Army.
However as his son’s vice president, “he just became very hard-line and very different from the Dick Cheney I knew and worked with,” Bush said.
He speculated that Cheney was influenced by his deeply conservative wife Lynne, whom Bush described as “the eminence grise.”
The elder Bush however acknowledged that his son was responsible for empowering Cheney and Rumsfeld, and at times used language that was too bellicose.
“Hot rhetoric is pretty easy to get headlines, but it doesn’t necessarily solve the diplomatic problem,” Bush told Meacham, according to The Times.
Bush specifically cited George W.’s 2002 “Axis of Evil” speech linking US enemies Iraq, Iran and North Korea.


World’s oldest man dies in Japan at 112

Updated 25 February 2020

World’s oldest man dies in Japan at 112

  • Chitetsu Watanabe, who was born on March 5, 1907 in Niigata, north of Tokyo, died on Sunday at his nursing home
  • The news came less than two weeks after Watanabe was officially recognized by Guinness World Records

TOKYO: A Japanese man recently named the world’s oldest living male has died aged 112, a local official said Tuesday.

Chitetsu Watanabe, who was born on March 5, 1907 in Niigata, north of Tokyo, died on Sunday at his nursing home in the same prefecture, the official said.

The news came less than two weeks after he was officially recognized by Guinness World Records.

Watanabe, who had five children, said the secret to longevity was to “not get angry and keep a smile on your face.”

He admitted a penchant for sweets such as custard pudding and ice cream.

The oldest man in Japan is now Issaku Tomoe, who is 110 years old, according to Jiji Press, although it was not clear if Tomoe holds the title globally.

The oldest living person is also Japanese, Kane Tanaka, a 117-year-old woman.

Japan has one of the world’s highest life expectancies and has been home to several people recognized as among the oldest humans to have ever lived.

They include Jiroemon Kimura, the longest-living man on record, who died soon after his 116th birthday in June 2013.

The oldest verified person — Jeanne Louise Calment of France — died in 1997 at the age of 122, according to Guinness.