Gaza ‘Arab Idol’ star becomes symbol of Palestinian unity

Updated 21 June 2013
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Gaza ‘Arab Idol’ star becomes symbol of Palestinian unity

GAZA: Palestinian fans and big business are rallying behind a 22-year-old singer from the Gaza Strip in a final push to vote him the next “Arab Idol” in a TV talent contest choosing a winner in Beirut tomorrow.
Mohammed Assaf is the first Palestinian to qualify for Arab Idol, the Middle East’s version of American Idol, in which contestants perform for judges and voting viewers.
His potent mix of good looks and emotional lyrics about ancestral Palestinian lands have helped to turn the young man from Gaza’s Khan Younes refugee camp into a star and symbol of unity for Palestinians plagued by deep internal divisions.
Voting in the pan-Arab competition is done through text messages. To encourage support for Assaf, one of three finalists, two Palestinian cellular telephone companies have cut their rates for ballots cast for him.
The Bank of Palestine is throwing money into the campaign, promising to match up to 350,000 texted votes — each one costs 1.50 shekels ($ .40) — for Assaf. It has placed billboards with his picture at major intersections in Gaza and the West Bank.
“Vote and the Bank of Palestine votes with you,” says a radio and television commercial broadcast in the Palestinian territories, where Assaf’s songs blare constantly from vehicles.
President Mahmoud Abbas has spoken to Assaf by phone and instructed Palestinian embassies abroad to urge expatriates to vote for him, calling the singer “the pride of the Palestinian and Arab nation.”
Egyptian Ahmed Jamal and a Syrian woman, Farah Youssef, are also finalists in the contest broadcast.
To keep the votes for Assaf coming, the Palestinian cellular operator Jawwal is offering cash prizes of up to $ 10,000 for customers who text in the highest number of ballots.
Some cafes in the West Bank city of Ramallah are offering to text a vote for every cup of coffee that customers order.
“By voting for Assaf, we are voting for Palestine, for us,” read a typical entry on his Facebook fan pages.
Huge celebrations are likely on the streets of the West Bank and Gaza if he wins.


Mo Salah’s wife: Egyptian women’s icon who shuns limelight

Updated 18 September 2019

Mo Salah’s wife: Egyptian women’s icon who shuns limelight

  • Salah prefers to keep his private life in general away from the glare of the media

CAIRO: Magi Sadeq, 25, is known for keeping a low profile in the media compared to the wives of other footballers. 

The wife of Liverpool and Egypt star Mohamed Salah has become something of a celebrity in her own right after appearing with her husband while maintaining a conservative look.

Salah prefers to keep his private life in general away from the glare of the media, but sometimes there is no escaping the spotlight for his wife and daughter.

Sadeq appeared with her husband at celebrations held by the Confederation of African Football when Salah won the African Player of the Year award. She also appeared with their daughter Makka during celebrations marking Salah’s winning of the Premier League Golden Boot award, and after Liverpool won the 2019 UEFA Champions League.

Sadeq was born and raised in Nagrig, a village in Gharbia where Salah was also born. It is the same place where they like to spend their holidays and special occasions whenever they have the chance.

FASTFACT

Sadeq appeared with her husband at celebrations held by the Confederation of African Football when Salah won the African Player of the Year award.

She has a twin sister, Mohab, and two other sisters, Mahy and Miram. Their parents were both teachers at Mohamed Eyad Al-Tantawi School, where she met the future Egyptian international.

Sadeq, who maintains a simple lifestyle, fell in love with Salah 10 years before they married. Their love story was the talk of the town where they lived.

They were married in 2013 as the player started taking his first steps in Europe with Swiss football club Basel. They married when he returned home for his first holiday.  

She keeps her husband connected to his rural roots. She doesn’t have any social media accounts, and unlike other footballer’s wives, she is not interested in appearance and makeup. She prefers to wear body-covering conservative clothes.

Sadeq and her twin sister both obtained their degrees in biotechnology from Alexandria University. She is responsible for her husband’s charity work in Egypt. Her neighbors say that she helps in buying the necessary home appliances and other needs of newly married couples. She also supervises charity work and regularly attends the special events staged by her village even though she has been made busier after her husband joined Liverpool.

Salah once said of his wife: “I am unfair to Magi as I give her the least of my time due to the nature of my work. I would like to thank her for her support and for being in my life.”