Islamophobic trolls attack Scottish politician who took oath in Urdu

Islamophobic trolls attack Scottish politician who took oath in Urdu
PROUD OF HERITAGE: Humza Yousaf has shared his photo of oath-taking ceremony on his Twitter account. (Courtesy photo)
Updated 15 May 2016

Islamophobic trolls attack Scottish politician who took oath in Urdu

Islamophobic trolls attack Scottish politician who took oath in Urdu

GLASGOW: In a strong show of British multiculturalism, a Muslim politician elected to Scottish Parliament delivered his oath of allegiance in Urdu while wearing a kilt.
But Humza Yousaf’s expression of love for the language of his Pakistani heritage faced a vile attack on Twitter.
Controversial Canadian writer @TarekFatah tweeted on a family photo Yousaf has shared that shows women in Hijab: “The new face of leftwing Scottish National Party @HumzaYousaf with his Islamist family of Sharia-Bolsheviks.”
Another tweeter namely @50degreesam said: “Abu Humza is nothing to do with Scotland. Only a tiny minority are as big pillocks as him.”
In his reply, Humza tweeted: “Think Islamaphobia just made up? This comes after I simply put up a pic of my family. Luckily more good ppl than bad.”
Yousaf, a member of the Scottish National Party who won a seat from the city of Glasgow, spoke first in English and then in Urdu, swearing "that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth" and concluding with "so help me God."
His party championed Scotland's unsuccessful bid for independence in 2014, framing its nationalism not on ethnic identity but on the desire for a distinct, diverse nation to have greater control over its affairs. The SNP now dominates politics in Edinburgh and has a sizable bloc of seats in Westminster as well.
On Twitter, Yousaf laughed off the predictable backlash to his oath from those fearful of the role of Islam in British society.
Yousaf was not the only politician to take the oath in another language: Other members of Scottish Parliament spoke in local tongues such as Doric, Gaelic and Scots.