Jordanian king says status of Jerusalem must be resolved to avoid ‘catastrophe’

Updated 25 January 2018

Jordanian king says status of Jerusalem must be resolved to avoid ‘catastrophe’

LONDON: King Abdullah of Jordan told the World Economic Forum in Davos that Jerusalem “could be a city that brings us together or it could create aggression and violence that we haven’t seen before.”

He was speaking in response to a question linked to President Donald Trump’s decision that the US will formally recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, with Vice President Mike Pence saying recently that the US Embassy would be ready to move from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem by the end of 2019. 

Trump’s controversial decision has sparked protests by Palestinians and Muslims throughout the world.

King Abdullah said Jerusalem had to be part of a comprehensive peace settlement between Israelis and Palestinians — a stance backed by the EU and by all American presidents before Trump.

He said: “(Trump’s decision) has created a backlash. It has frustrated the Palestinians as they think there isn't an honest broker.”

However, King Abdullah added: “I would like to reserve judgement because we are still waiting for the Americans to come out with their plan. But tremendous sympathy to the way the Palestinians are feeling. Jerusalem is such an emotional subject for everybody.”

He continued: “Jerusalem is a city that ends up dividing us, which I think will be catastrophic for mankind, or is it a city of hope that brings us together.”

He said it was eternal to Jews, Christians and Muslims and asked the audience to remember Pope Francis's message at Christmas, hoping that Jerusalem would be dealt with as part of a negotiated settlement.

“This is a city that could create tremendous problems for us in the future. It could be a city that brings us together or it could create violence that we haven't seen before,” said King Abdullah.

The king also told the meeting of world leaders in Davos that a one-state solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict would not be acceptable, but the alternative is not as many envisaged.

“The two-state solution the way that we envisage is not the same two-state solution that (Israel and the US) are looking at,” he said.

But he said he did not expect a one-state solution to emerge, as some have proposed.

“I can’t envisage a one-state solution that would be acceptable,” he said.

King Abdullah also spoke about the Arab Spring, saying that it would eventually give rise to pan-Arab sentiment among citizens of the region.

“Arab nationalism ended in the Arab Spring,” he said.

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US to pay over $1bn for 100m doses of J&J’s potential COVID-19 vaccine

Updated 28 min 41 sec ago

US to pay over $1bn for 100m doses of J&J’s potential COVID-19 vaccine

  • The latest contract equates to roughly $10 per vaccine dose produced by J&J
  • This is J&J’s first deal to supply its investigational vaccine to a country

WASHINGTON: The United States government will pay Johnson & Johnson over $1 billion for 100 million doses of its potential coronavirus vaccine, its latest such arrangement as the race to tame the pandemic intensifies, the drugmaker said on Wednesday.
It said it would deliver the vaccine to the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) on a not-for-profit basis to be used after approval or emergency use authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
J&J has already received $1 billion in funding from the US government — BARDA agreed in March to provide that money for the company to build manufacturing capacity for more than 1 billion doses of the experimental vaccine.
The latest contract equates to roughly $10 per vaccine dose produced by J&J. Including the first $1 billion deal with the USgovernment, the price would be slightly higher than the $19.50 per dose that the United States is paying for the vaccine being developed by Pfizer Inc. and German biotech BioNTech SE.
The US government may also purchase an additional 200 million doses under a subsequent agreement. J&J did not disclose that deal’s value.
J&J plans to study a one- or two-dose regimen of the vaccine in parallel later this year. A single-shot regimen could allow more people to be vaccinated with the same number of doses and would sidestep issues around getting people to come back for their second dose.
This is J&J’s first deal to supply its investigational vaccine to a country. Talks are underway with the European Union, but no deal has yet been reached.
J&J’s investigational vaccine is currently being tested on healthy volunteers in the United States and Belgium in an early-stage study.
There are currently no approved vaccines for COVID-19. More than 20 are in clinical trials.