Arab coalition in Yemen hands over child-soldiers forced to fight by Houthi terrorists

This july 16, 2017 file photo shows a Yemeni boy posing with a Kalashnikov assault rifle during a gathering of newly-recruited Houthi terrorist fighters in the capital Sanaa. (Mohammed Huwais/AFP)
Updated 25 January 2018

Arab coalition in Yemen hands over child-soldiers forced to fight by Houthi terrorists

DUBAI: The Saudi Arabian-led coalition in Yemen has handed 27 children to the Yemeni government after they were caught fighting with Houthi terrorist fighters on the border with the Kingdom, state news agency SPA reported.
An official coalition source said the Houthi militia were forcing Yemeni children to fight on the frontline.
The children were handed over at Sharourah force command in the presence of representatives from various organizations including members of the coalition forces, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Saudi Red Crescent Authority, and the head of Child Protection Unit in Armed Conflict.
The children were transported by bus to Marib.


Banks in Lebanon reopen amid security increase

Updated 34 min 32 sec ago

Banks in Lebanon reopen amid security increase

  • Two security guards will be placed in front of each bank, and security patrols will be conducted in cities

BEIRUT: Banks in Lebanon will reopen on Tuesday after the Association of Banks in Lebanon approved measures to ease the anger of depositors and customers. 

More than 3,000 members of Beirut’s police, the regional gendarmerie, the judicial police, and the information division of the Internal Security Forces will provide protection to banks and their employees, who carried out an open strike for a week.

They did so due to customers’ anger over measures applied by banks on withdrawals and transfers amid Lebanon’s severe political and economic crisis, which sparked mass protests that have been ongoing for 33 days.

Two security guards will be placed in front of each bank, and security patrols will be conducted in cities.

The Association of Banks in Lebanon decided on Sunday to “stop restrictions on new funds transferred from abroad, provided that remittances abroad only cover urgent personal expenses.”

It also decided to lift restrictions on the circulation of checks, transfers, and the use of credit cards in Lebanon. 

As for the use of credit cards abroad, ceilings are determined by agreements between banks and customers.

The association has determined a maximum cash withdrawal rate of $1,000 per week for holders of current accounts in dollars, while checks issued in foreign currencies will be transferred into their account.

It has also urged customers to “use their credit cards, especially in Lebanese pounds, to buy their needs.”

Meanwhile, protesters are preparing to block roads leading to Parliament in the heart of Beirut on Tuesday, to prevent a legislative session from taking place. The session had already been postponed for a week.

In an attempt to placate protesters, the presidential palace’s media office said the president has ordered investigations into “financial crimes, waste, forgery, money laundering and suspicious transactions,” as well as “negligence at work, promotion of counterfeit medicines and suspicious reconciliation contracts.”