Rolls-Royce problem in Trent engines used for Boeing jets spreads

Rolls-Royce has been hit by a problem with a compressor in the Trent 1000 package C engine, similar to one above, that is not lasting as long as expected, grounding planes, forcing inspections and angering airline clients. (Reuters)
Updated 13 June 2018

Rolls-Royce problem in Trent engines used for Boeing jets spreads

LONDON: Britain’s Rolls-Royce said a costly compressor problem that had grounded Boeing planes had now been found in a different type of engine, compounding pressures on a group that is due to cut more than 4,000 jobs this week.
Britain’s best-known engineering company has been hit by a problem with a compressor in the Trent 1000 package C engine that is not lasting as long as expected, grounding planes, forcing inspections and angering airline clients.
The engine powers Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner jet.
On Monday it said it had now found the same issue on a “small number of high life Package B engines,” requiring a one-off inspection of the B fleet and sending its shares down 1 percent.
The news, which will not affect Rolls’ full-year free cash flow target, comes as the group embarks on the latest stage of a major restructuring program under Chief Executive Warren East that is designed to boost profitability.
On Friday the group will host a capital markets day where, according to a person familiar with the situation, it will announce more than 4,000 job cuts, mostly in Britain and affecting support and management roles.
The group, which employs 50,000 people in 50 countries, is also expected to set out how it will make a return on the investment made in recent years and the expected drivers of cash flow beyond its medium-term horizon.
The news about the compressor issue will not help however as Rolls has been fighting to show it has a lid on a problem which has forced airline customers to lease alternative planes to fly in the busy summer holiday period.
The existing package C issue had led to about 30 of the affected aircraft being grounded at any one time for checks. They were flown by airlines including British Airways, Virgin Atlantic and Air New Zealand.
Air New Zealand said earlier this month it would lease two Boeing 777s to cover for 787-9s that are affected by the Rolls engine issue.
Airlines that use the package C engine tend to also take the package B engine. According to Rolls some 380 package C engines are in service while there are 166 package B engines in service.
Rolls said that while this new problem would incur some additional cost, it did not expect it to affect its free cash flow guidance for 2018.
Analysts welcomed the fact the group did not revise the target and noted the comment that the package B issue only affected a “small number” of engines.


Saudi Aramco shares soar at maximum 10% on market debut

Updated 11 December 2019

Saudi Aramco shares soar at maximum 10% on market debut

  • Company is now world’s largest publicly traded company, bigger than Apple

RIYADH: Saudi Aramco shares opened at 35.2 riyals ($9.39) on Wednesday at the Kingdom’s stock exchange, 10 percent above their IPO price of 32 riyals, in their first day of trading following a record $26.5 billion initial public offering.
Aramco has earlier priced its IPO at 32 riyals ($8.53) per share, the high end of the target range, surpassing the $25 billion raised by Chinese retail giant Alibaba in its 2014 Wall Street debut.
Aramco’s earlier indicative debut price was seen at 35.2 riyals, 10 per cent above IPO price, raising the company’s valuation to $1.88 trillion, Refintiv data showed.
At that price, Aramco is world’s most valuable listed company. That’s more than the top five oil companies – Exxon Mobil, Total, Royal Dutch Shell, Chevron and BP – combined.
“Today Aramco will become the largest listed company in the world and (Tadawul) among the top ten global financial markets,” Sarah Al-Suhaimi, chairwoman of the Saudi Arabian stock exchange, said during a ceremony marking the oil giant’s first day of trading.
“Aramco today is the largest integrated oil and gas company in the world. Before Saudi Arabia was the only shareholder of the company, now there are 5 million shareholders including citizens, residents and investors,” said Yasir Al-Rumayyan, the managing director and chief executive of the Saudi Public Investment Fund.
“Aramco’s IPO will enhance the company’s governance and strengthen its standards.”
Amin Nasser, the president and CEO of Saudi Aramco, meanwhile thanked the new shareholders for their confidence and trust of the oil company.
The sale of 1.5 percent of the firm, or three billion shares, is the bedrock of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s ambitious strategy to overhaul the oil-reliant economy.
Riyadh’s Tadawul stock exchange earlier said it will hold an opening auction for Aramco shares for an hour from 9:30 a.m. followed by continuous trading, with price changes limited to plus or minus 10 percent.

The company said Friday it could exercise a “greenshoe” option, selling additional shares to bring the total raised up to $29.4 billion.
The market launch puts the oil behemoth’s value at $1.7 trillion, far ahead of other firms in the trillion-dollar club, including Apple and Microsoft.
Two-thirds of the shares were offered to institutional investors. Saudi government bodies accounted for 13.2 percent of the institutional tranche, investing around $2.3 billion, according to lead IPO manager Samba Capital.
The IPO is a crucial part of Prince Mohammed’s plan to wean the economy away from oil by pumping funds into megaprojects and non-energy industries such as tourism and entertainment.
Watch the video marking Aramco’s opening trading: