Saudi Arabia’s Maaden signs MoU with GE to discuss digital cooperation in mining sector

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The Saudi Arabian Mining Company (Maaden) signed a strategic memorandum of understanding (MoU) with General Electric (GE). (SPA)
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The Saudi Arabian Mining Company (Maaden) signed a strategic memorandum of understanding (MoU) with General Electric (GE). (SPA)
Updated 20 July 2018

Saudi Arabia’s Maaden signs MoU with GE to discuss digital cooperation in mining sector

RIYADH: The Saudi Arabian Mining Company (Maaden) signed a strategic memorandum of understanding (MoU) with General Electric (GE) on Thursday, which focused on exploring possible opportunities to support digital transformation in the industrial sector.
The two sides discussed opportunities for cooperation in advanced technical solutions that included the entire chain of Maaden’s mining operations, including activities at gold, copper, aluminum and phosphate sites.
The MoU includes utilizing GE’s technological expertise and modern applications in digital transformation, with Maaden to lead the company’s digital transformation programs.
The agreement is part of Maaden’s drive to partner with leading technology and digital solutions to leverage opportunities in technological innovation and the modern digital revolution, invest in leading technologies in its operations around the Kingdom, and enhance the company’s competitiveness as a major company in the mining sector both regionally and globally.
Maaden’s digital mining solutions will improve the company’s business by improving energy costs, enhancing reliability and efficiency of performance and productivity, while improving maintenance costs.
“The Kingdom is at the forefront of the digital transformation efforts in the industrial sector in the region with an ambitious vision. We are proud to support these ambitious visions and meet their goals,” said Darren Davis, Maaden Chief Executive Officer.
Davis stressed that a sustainable mining sector is one of the key pillars of the national economy, saying: “We are confident that our partnership with GE will be a qualitative leap toward achieving these goals and enhancing our competitiveness and sustainability through effective digital industrial solutions.”
“We are keen to build constructive partnerships with the industrial sector around the world to deliver innovative digital solutions that support operations.
“Major companies such as Maaden are of immense importance, and we recognize the impact of improved operations and enhancements,” said GE CEO Bill Roh, referring to its efficiency over other companies, and the Saudi economy as a whole.
“By collaborating to develop industry-specific and environment-friendly solutions in which Maaden manages its operations, we are moving toward achieving the desired digital transformation plans that we believe will deliver significant positive results,” added Roh.
The MoU aims to achieve the goals of Maaden, a pioneer in the Saudi mining sector, to accelerate the digital transformation of the Saudi mining sector, in line with the objectives of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.
Maaden is working to take advantage of digital and technological transformation strategies and maximize its impact on all the company’s activities and products.
The construction of the largest 450-km treated water pipeline from Taif to support the company’s mining operations in the region, as well as the creation of artificial lakes in Ras Al-Khair for recycling water for industrial uses, are among the most prominent projects that reflect the company’s commitment to sustainability and achieving solutions, in addition to innovation and sustained economic growth, creating a professional environment that enhances talent capabilities, and ensuring the best service for communities within their professional fields.


White House says Trump regrets not raising tariffs higher

US President Donald Trump arrives at the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Sunday. Trump had been trying to use the conference to rally global leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the US ahead of his reelection. (AP)
Updated 26 August 2019

White House says Trump regrets not raising tariffs higher

  • President’s comments appear at first to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the US leader

TOKYO: President Donald Trump said Sunday that he had second thoughts about escalating the trade war with China, but the White House later reversed that message saying the president was misinterpreted and that his only regret in hiking tariffs is that he didn’t raise them higher. Trump faced a tense reception from world leaders meeting amid mounting anxiety of a global economic slowdown at the Group of Seven summit in France. During a breakfast meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Trump suggested he had qualms about the spiraling conflict. “Yeah. For sure,” Trump told reporters when asked if he has second thoughts about escalating the dispute, adding he has “second thoughts about everything.”
But hours later, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham issued a statement saying Trump’s comments about US tariffs on China were “greatly misinterpreted.”
She said Trump only responded “in the affirmative — because he regrets not raising the tariffs higher.” The comments appeared at first to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the famously hard-nosed leader. But the later reversal fit a pattern for Trump in recoiling from statements he believes suggest weakness.

HIGHLIGHTS

• President Donald Trump faced a tense reception from world leaders meeting amid mounting anxiety of a global economic slowdown at the Group of Seven summit in France.

• White House said comments about US tariffs on China were ‘greatly misinterpreted.’

Trump had been trying to use the conference to rally global leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the US ahead of his reelection. Trump’s counterparts, including Johnson, are trying to convince him to back off his trade wars with China and other countries, which they see as contributing to the economic weakening.

US-Japan agreement
Trump and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced on Sunday a deal in principle on a major bilateral trade deal.
“It’s a very big transaction,” Trump said after talks with Abe on the sidelines of the G7 summit.
“Billions and billions of dollars,” he said. “It involves agriculture, it involves e-commerce. It involves many things. We’ve agreed in principle.”

Amazon fires
Also on Sunday, French President Emmanuel Macron said that world leaders at the G7 summit have agreed to help the countries affected by the huge wildfires ravaging the Amazon rainforest as soon as possible.
“We are all agreed on helping those countries which have been hit by the fires as fast as possible,” he told journalists.