Riyadh Future Investment Initiative summit on schedule for next week

The Future Investment Initiative will be held in Riyadh from Oct. 23 to 25. (Future Investment Initiative website)
Updated 22 October 2018

Riyadh Future Investment Initiative summit on schedule for next week

  • Future Investment Initiative to go ahead despite ‘disappointing’ withdrawals.
  • It will be held in Riyadh from Oct. 23 to 25.

RIYADH: Officials and business leaders including US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde and JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon are set to attend an investment summit in Saudi Arabia next week.
The Future Investment Initiative (FII) is going ahead despite the “disappointing” withdrawal of some speakers and partners.
It will be held in Riyadh from Oct. 23 to 25.
“Despite the disappointing withdrawal of some speakers and partners, we look forward to welcoming thousands of speakers, session managers and guests from around the world,” an FII spokesman said in a statement quoted by Asharq Al-Awsat.
An earlier statement gave an overview of the event, saying that “investing in transformation,” “technology as opportunity” and “advancing human potential” are among the FII’s broad themes.
Mohammed Khunaizi, a Shoura Council member, said that government and business leaders will map out a “collective vision for future” at the event.
“The FII conference has emerged as the largest investment event of its kind in the Middle East, which offers opportunities for billions of dollars in business deals besides being an educative forum,” he said.
JPMorgan chief Dimon has been quoted in media reports as saying: “I am looking forward to attending the Future Investment Initiative in Riyadh to discuss innovation in technology and what it means to all of us.”
Sami A. Al-Rajhi, a Saudi business executive, said: “The FII seeks to further explore how investment will drive growth opportunities regionally and globally.
“The event will help to bring many business opportunities to the country in particular and to the Middle East in general, which will support job creation, innovation and unlock economic opportunities.”


Lebanon central bank reassures foreign investors about deposits

Updated 25 January 2020

Lebanon central bank reassures foreign investors about deposits

  • Khalaf Ahmad Al-Habtoor asked if there was any risk to dollar deposits
  • The heavily indebted country’s crisis has shaken confidence in banks

BEIRUT: Lebanon’s central bank said on Saturday there would be no “haircut” on deposits at banks due to the country’s financial crisis, responding to concerns voiced by a UAE businessman about risks to foreign investments there.

Emirati Khalaf Ahmad Al-Habtoor, founder of the Al-Habtoor Group that has two hotels in Beirut, posted a video of himself on his official Twitter account asking Lebanon’s central bank governor if there was any risk to dollar deposits of foreign investors and whether there could be any such haircut.

“The declared policy of the Central Bank of Lebanon is not to bankrupt any bank thus preserving the depositors. Also the law in Lebanon doesn’t allow haircut,” the Banque Du Liban (BDL) said in a Twitter post addressed to Al-Habtoor, from Governor Riad Salameh.

“BDL is providing the liquidity needed by banks in both Lebanese pound and dollars, but under one condition that the dollars lent by BDL won’t be transferred abroad.”

“All funds received by Lebanese banks from abroad after November 17th are free to be transferred out,” it added on its official Twitter account.

The heavily indebted country’s crisis has shaken confidence in banks and raised concerns over its ability to repay one of the world’s highest levels of public debt.

Seeking to prevent capital flight as hard currency inflows slowed and anti-government protests erupted, banks have been imposing informal controls on access to cash and transfers abroad since last October.

A new government was formed this week, and its main task is to tackle the dire financial crisis that has seen the Lebanese pound weaken against the dollar.

Al-Habtoor had asked Salameh for clarity for Arab investors concerned about the crisis and those thinking of transferring funds to Lebanon to try to “help the brotherly Lebanese.”