Raising our hats to the Style Stakes at Dubai World Cup

Among those who did not enter the competition, the all-white look seemed to be a favorite, while a few stood out with bold choices.(AN)
Updated 02 April 2019

Raising our hats to the Style Stakes at Dubai World Cup

  • Thousands from across the world sported unique looks at the annual event
  • The all-white look seemed to be a favorite, while a few stood out with bold choices

DUBAI: From peacock-feather hats to full-blown gowns, fashion at the Dubai World Cup is always a sight to see, and the regalia at this year’s 24th edition of horse racing at Meydan Racecourse did not disappoint.

Thousands from across the world sported unique looks at the annual event, as they watched jockeys and their steeds battle it out for the $35m prize purse on Saturday.

But horse racing aside, the event is also known for its glamour as the most outlandish and best-dressed attempt to outdo each other at the Style Stakes contest.

Hundreds entered the fashion competition that ran throughout the day alongside the horse races.

Photo gallery: Looks from Dubai World Cup 2019

Fashionistas entered themselves into the competition and were judged by five industry experts that included stylist Kelly Lundberg, designer Noor Breish, women’s hat designer Ana Pribylova, Esquire Middle East fashion director Mark McMahon and Saudi influencer Tamara Al-Gabbani.

There were six categories, including best hat, most creative hat and best dressed.

Eleanor Campbell won best dressed, while Australian nurse Conna Tution won best hat for her blue and golden headpiece, which she said was her tribute to the desert. Eksuda Vassakosol received the prize for most creative hat for one that was inspired by afternoon tea. Prizes amounted to more than $68,000 and included shopping gift vouchers and brunch packages.

Among those who did not enter the competition, the all-white look seemed to be a favorite, while a few stood out with bold choices. The look of the day for Arab News was a woman in a bright salmon suit, which she paired with a white shirt and black ribbon tie, wearing a see-through mesh tophat with a cut-out horse on the inside.

Other favourites included a white bow hat, decorated with white feathers and a delicate net over the eyes: a simple, traditional look, yet elegant nonetheless.


Lack of spirit leaves World War II saga hanging midway

Roland Emmerich’s just-opened “Midway” comes nowhere close to the 1950s and 1960s war adventures. (Supplied)
Updated 14 November 2019

Lack of spirit leaves World War II saga hanging midway

CHENNAI: Movies on World War II have delighted cinema audiences for years. Nobody can forget the daring Allied escape in the 1965 “Von Ryan’s Express” with Frank Sinatra and Trevor Howard driving a train through Nazi-occupied territory.

There were others in that decade and earlier such as David Lean’s “The Bridge on the River Kwai” about British prisoners of war building a railway in malaria-infested Burma (now Myanmar). These were great classics, but recent efforts have not been as memorable.

(Supplied)

Roland Emmerich’s just-opened “Midway” comes nowhere close to the 1950s and 1960s war adventures. Despite audiences still being thirsty for WWII sagas and a star-studded cast (Patrick Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Mandy Moore, Ed Skrein and Nick Jonas), the film is unmoving, mainly because of the shallow characters. If the dialogues are stiff, the dramatic potential – including the relationship among the men – appears to have been left midway.

The film begins with Japan’s December 1941 air attack on the US naval base in Pearl Harbor, Honolulu, which dragged America into the conflict, and the flick follows America’s revenge mission culminating in the June 1942 Battle of Midway.

(Supplied)

For the US, it was a victory against all odds giving them control of the Pacific’s Midway atoll. It was also a major triumph of human spirit, but the film does not quite capture it.

Most of the exploits relate to real-life fighter pilot Dick Best (Skrein), whose devil-may-care attitude earns him the title “cowboy.” His wife Ann (Moore), the only female character, urges him on but seems a washed-out figure. However, there is plenty of action in the air with dog fights, bombings and pilots ejecting from burning planes high above the ground.

(Supplied)

For fans of singer Jonas, his small but significant part may appeal. He is sailor Bruno Gaido whose spontaneous and heroic action during a Japanese raid earns him promotion.

“Midway” plays at three levels, including one about Japanese military officers, and was shot in Hawaii and Montreal with a lot of computer graphics thrown in. The camera work (Robby Baumgartner) is impressive, but somewhere the soul is missing, and the characters fail to come across as real people.

Despite this, the film opened atop the North American box office last weekend with a reported $17.5 million in ticket sales.