Raising our hats to the Style Stakes at Dubai World Cup

Among those who did not enter the competition, the all-white look seemed to be a favorite, while a few stood out with bold choices.(AN)
Updated 02 April 2019

Raising our hats to the Style Stakes at Dubai World Cup

  • Thousands from across the world sported unique looks at the annual event
  • The all-white look seemed to be a favorite, while a few stood out with bold choices

DUBAI: From peacock-feather hats to full-blown gowns, fashion at the Dubai World Cup is always a sight to see, and the regalia at this year’s 24th edition of horse racing at Meydan Racecourse did not disappoint.

Thousands from across the world sported unique looks at the annual event, as they watched jockeys and their steeds battle it out for the $35m prize purse on Saturday.

But horse racing aside, the event is also known for its glamour as the most outlandish and best-dressed attempt to outdo each other at the Style Stakes contest.

Hundreds entered the fashion competition that ran throughout the day alongside the horse races.

Photo gallery: Looks from Dubai World Cup 2019

Fashionistas entered themselves into the competition and were judged by five industry experts that included stylist Kelly Lundberg, designer Noor Breish, women’s hat designer Ana Pribylova, Esquire Middle East fashion director Mark McMahon and Saudi influencer Tamara Al-Gabbani.

There were six categories, including best hat, most creative hat and best dressed.

Eleanor Campbell won best dressed, while Australian nurse Conna Tution won best hat for her blue and golden headpiece, which she said was her tribute to the desert. Eksuda Vassakosol received the prize for most creative hat for one that was inspired by afternoon tea. Prizes amounted to more than $68,000 and included shopping gift vouchers and brunch packages.

Among those who did not enter the competition, the all-white look seemed to be a favorite, while a few stood out with bold choices. The look of the day for Arab News was a woman in a bright salmon suit, which she paired with a white shirt and black ribbon tie, wearing a see-through mesh tophat with a cut-out horse on the inside.

Other favourites included a white bow hat, decorated with white feathers and a delicate net over the eyes: a simple, traditional look, yet elegant nonetheless.


Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

The singer's maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian. (Getty)
Updated 05 June 2020

Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

DUBAI: Girl group Little Mix’s star Jade Thirlwall has opened up about bullying she experienced as a teenager due to her Arab roots.

Speaking on the BBC “No Country For Young Women” podcast, the 2011 “X-Factor” finalist, whose maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian, said that she felt “ashamed” of her background. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

oh hey it’s me shamelessly plugging #BreakUpSong for the 1847th time via a thirst trap pic

A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on

“When I went to secondary school, I was literally one of three people of color in the school,” the 27-year-old music sensation, whose father is British, said.

“I remember one time I got pinned down in the toilets and they put a bindi spot on my forehead; it was horrific.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

look in the notebook.

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“I have constantly had this inner battle of not really knowing who I am, or where I fit in, or what community I fit into,” she said.

The singer recalled that she would put white powder on her face “to whiten” herself when performing on stage at her school.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

finding a new love for my natural hair⚡️

A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on

After joining Little Mix, she “subconsciously” did not want to talk about her heritage for fear of being disliked.

“I think because I was bullied quite badly in school because of the color of my skin and for being Arab, I wasn’t very proud of who I was,” Thirlwall explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

category is: 80s realness @madison_phipps

A post shared by Little Mix (@littlemix) on

“I would hate to talk about my race and heritage and not say the right things,” she added.