Saudi envoy discusses Syria war crimes probe with top judge

Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the Abdallah Al-Mouallimi meets former French judge Catherine Marchi-Uhel in New York. (SPA)
Updated 26 April 2019

Saudi envoy discusses Syria war crimes probe with top judge

  • Abdallah Al-Mouallimi met former French judge Catherine Marchi-Uhel, who leads the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM)

NEW YORK: Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the United Nations on Thursday met the head of an organization that helps to investigate and prosecute Syria war crimes, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.

Abdallah Al-Mouallimi met former French judge Catherine Marchi-Uhel, who leads the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM).

The body’s mandate is to assist in the investigation and prosecution of those responsible for the most serious crimes under international law committed in Syria since March 2011.

The meeting was at the Kingdom’s permanent mission to the UN in New York, where both sides discussed the work of IIIM and the international support provided.

Saudi Arabia was one of the countries that voted during the UN General Assembly in favor of establishing IIIM, with the aim of  collecting, consolidating, preserving and analyzing information and evidence of violations of international humanitarian law, international crimes, and human rights violations and abuses; and preparing files to facilitate and expedite fair and independent criminal proceedings, in accordance with international law standards.

Earlier this week a Saudi representative to the UN warned that there would be “no peace without justice” in the long-running Syrian conflict, SPA reported.

Dr. Khaled Manzlawiy, deputy permanent representative of the permanent mission of Saudi Arabia to the UN in New York, took part in talks on ways to protect the rights of Syrian war victims.

IIIM had been set up as a result of the UN Security Council’s inability to lay the foundations for international peace and justice, and the failure of previous decisions on human rights in Syria regarding the protection of displaced people and the preservation of life, he added.
 


Saudi anti-graft agency probes 105 corruption cases in different sectors

Updated 08 July 2020

Saudi anti-graft agency probes 105 corruption cases in different sectors

  • A Nazaha official said the Kingdom will continue to pursue cases of misappropriation of public money
  • The cases involved fraud, bribery, and financial and professional corruption

RIYADH: The Saudi Control and Anti-Corruption Authority (Nazaha) has initiated 105 corruption cases in the health, interior, power, and education sectors.
The cases involved fraud, bribery, and financial and professional corruption.
A Nazaha official said the Kingdom will continue to pursue cases of misappropriation of public money and harming state interests.
One of the cases involves the arrest of three employees working at the Saudi Electricity Co. for receiving a bribe amounting to €535,000 ($604,570) from a French company and opening bank accounts in another country (at the request of the company) for money laundering. Another case is the arrest of a university faculty member for asking for a bribe amounting to SR80,000 ($21,328) from a number of companies working on different projects at the university.
The authority also arrested a doctor at the Ministry of Health for violating the regulations at a quarantine facility.
A brigadier general was arrested for using his official vehicle to facilitate the passage of another private vehicle through security points during the curfew period.