Saudi climbers Mona Shabab and Saud Al-Eidi praised after reaching Everest summit

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Al-Eidi, on a different ascent, posted a picture to his Instagram profile once he reached the Everest summit. (Instagram: @saud_ed)
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Two Saudi Arabians - Shabab (center, left) and Al-Eidi (center, right) have been awarded on their return to the Kingdom for reaching the summit of Mount Everest last week. (SPA)
Updated 29 May 2019

Saudi climbers Mona Shabab and Saud Al-Eidi praised after reaching Everest summit

  • It took the duo 60 days to complete the trek to the top of the world’s highest peak (8,850 meters)
  • Two climbers were welcomed on their return to Jeddah

RIYADH: Two Saudi Arabians have been awarded on their return to the Kingdom for reaching the summit of Mount Everest last week.
Saud Al-Eidi and Mona Shabab were welcomed on their return to Jeddah by Prince Bandar bin Khalid bin Fahd, chairman of the Saudi Federation for Climbing. Saudi ambassador to US Princess Reema bint Bandar was also present at the ceremony.




Two Saudi Arabians - Shabab (center, left) and Al-Eidi (center, right) have been awarded on their return to the Kingdom for reaching the summit of Mount Everest last week. (SPA)

It took the duo 60 days to complete the trek to the top of the world’s highest peak (8,850 meters). Prince Bandar paid tribute to their achievement and urged them to continue in their efforts to reach other world heights.
Speaking to Arab News earlier this month from Everest Base Camp, Shabab said: “One of my goals is for us to gently shake the world, to change misperceptions, and maybe even shatter some stereotypes. Many raise an eyebrow when they hear a Saudi woman has achieved something.

“Saudi women can, Saudi women will, reach whatever heights they set their mind and heart to,” she added.
Shahab now wants to scale two of the world’s highest seven summits — Australia’s tallest mountain, Mount Kosciuszko, and Denali, the highest point in North America. They form part of the world’s “Seven Summits” and the Explorers Grand Slam title — which requires adventurers to reach the North Pole and the South Pole in addition to the seven peaks.




Mona Shabab's climbing journey so far. (Arab News)

Once she achieves that she intends to make her way to the North and South Pole on skis and become the first Saudi to complete the Explorers Grand Slam challenge. In 2012, she scaled the summit of Africa’s tallest mountain Kilimanjaro and two years later reached the peak of Mont Blanc in France.
Al-Eidi, on a different ascent, posted a picture to his Instagram profile once he reached the summit with a message thanking friends and family for their continued support after “six years of training and 60 days in the Himalayas.”

2019 has been one of the deadliest climbing seasons on Everest in recent memory, with at least 11 deaths so far this year.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.