EDM star Marshmello’s first Saudi gig is anything but mellow

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Marshmello performing at the Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal Basketball Arena at King Abdullah Sport City on Wednesday. (Supplied photo)
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Marshmello performing at the Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal Basketball Arena at King Abdullah Sport City on Wednesday. (Supplied photo)
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Marshmello performing at the Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal Basketball Arena at King Abdullah Sport City on Wednesday. (Supplied photo)
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Marshmello performing at the Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal Basketball Arena at King Abdullah Sport City on Wednesday. (Supplied photo)
Updated 11 July 2019
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EDM star Marshmello’s first Saudi gig is anything but mellow

  • Masked DJ and producer gets Jeddah crowd pumped up during a show packed with his hits
  • Saudi DJ duo Dish Dash kick the evening off with a well-received opening set

JEDDAH: American EDM artist Marshmello enthralled fans in Jeddah with a brilliant live performance on Wednesday night, his first in Saudi Arabia.

The evening began with a well-received opening set from acclaimed Saudi DJ duo Dish Dash, who are no strangers to performing in front of large crowds in the Kingdom.

After they finished up, the stage was set for the main attraction, and the eager fans who had filled the Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal Basketball Arena at King Abdullah Sport City began to chant his name. The chant turned to cheers when the opening bars of his song “Wolves,” featuring Selena Gomez, filled the venue, and when Marshmello appeared on stage the crowd erupted and many abandoned their seats.

Along with his undoubted musical talents, the mystery surrounding Marshmello’s peculiar stage persona has helped to fuel his rise to fame as a producer and DJ. His identity is hidden by a light-up, marshmallow-shaped helmet that completely covers his head, and he speaks as little as possible, happy to let his music do the talking.

Many people in the crowd were wearing replicas of his mask and others took selfies with them. Some fans danced along to the star’s music, at times attracting almost as much attention as their hero on stage.

One fan who attended the gig wearing a replica Marshmello outfit — and who, like the star, would not reveal their real identity — said: “I always cosplay as Marshmello at all the comic cons and everything, so him coming here was such good news I couldn’t believe it at first.”

Marshmello played all his best-known hits and remixes, including “Happier,” featuring Bastille, and “Silence” featuring Khalid. During the latter, he encouraged the audience to sing alternate lines, and throughout the show he kept the crowd engaged and energized by asking them to sing along and keep their hands up in the air.




Marshmello performing at the Prince Abdullah Al-Faisal Basketball Arena at King Abdullah Sport City on Wednesday. (Supplied photo)

His performance was filled with enthusiasm and energy, but when it finally came to the end it seemed very abrupt — he simply snapped a photo of his fans and left the stage. The audience cheered and clapped in the hope that he would return for an encore, but it was in vain.

As the crowd filed out of the venue, some of the Marshmello cosplayers danced outside to provide further entertainment for fans still buzzing with excitement.

“Seeing Marshmello in real life was so much better” than simply listening to his music, said Basma Mohammad, 30, as he left. “I just couldn’t sit down throughout the whole concert.”


KSRelief chief urges UN to condemn Iranian violence in Yemen

Updated 20 September 2019

KSRelief chief urges UN to condemn Iranian violence in Yemen

  • Iran-backed Houthi militias had been shelling government-controlled civilian areas in the past five years
  • So far 113 Yemeni civilians have been killed, 1,030 have been injured and 20,357 Saudis have been displaced from border regions

CHICAGO: The head of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) called on the UN to pass a resolution condemning the Iranian government for its support of a wave of violence by the Houthis against civilian targets in Yemen.

Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah said the violence is having a “significant negative impact” on the people of Yemen and on the humanitarian aid effort led by the Saudi government.

Referring to the recent drone strikes against the Aramco fields in Saudi Arabia that sent a shockwave through the oil industry and spiked oil and gasoline prices around the world, Al-Rabeeah said it was obvious the Houthis are not capable of mounting such high-tech strikes.

“The initial info indicates that the incident is an Iranian-made attack. We feel there is a need for an investigation by the UN,” Al-Rabeeah said. “Iran is behind many attacks against the region. The UN should take action. There should be a resolution against Iran. The involvement of the UN delivers a message.”

Although he said that the attack is still under investigation, he said that “drones are a technology that the Houthis do not have … the technology is beyond the abilities of the Houthis. There must be a country behind it.”

During a press briefing at the Saudi Embassy in Washington, DC, on Wednesday, Al-Rabeeah said as many as 20 humanitarian aid workers funded by a coalition of 80 nations led by Saudi Arabia have been injured or targeted.

He said providing humanitarian aid to the people of Yemen faces many challenges, including the targeting of women and the recruitment of children by the Iranian-backed Houthi militias.

“There is a need for the international community to unify and have the political will to fight any violations against humanitarian support,” Al-Rabeeah said.

Despite attacks by the Houthis against civilian and military targets and humanitarian aid workers, Al-Rabeeah said King Salman has made a commitment to ensure that the aid reaches civilians in areas controlled by the Houthis.

He said that the humanitarian effort has been hampered by the Houthi militia’s shelling of government-controlled civilian areas, releasing data showing 66,403 rocket attacks, 264 Scud missiles, and 233 drone assaults “that continues to increase,” such as the drone assault on the Aramco oil fields last week.

So far 113 Yemeni civilians have been killed, 1,030 have been injured and 20,357 Saudis have been displaced from border regions. Damage has been caused to 41 schools, six hospitals, and 20 mosques.

Despite the challenges, Al-Rabeeah said the humanitarian drive will continue until the conflict is brought to an end.

“We do not call for war against the region. Those attacks are not against Saudi Arabia. They are against all of us,” Al-Rabeeah said.