Clashes kill 3 civilians in Sudan’s Darfur, say doctors

Sudanese villagers walk in the war-torn town of Golo in central Darfur. (AFP/File)
Updated 12 August 2019

Clashes kill 3 civilians in Sudan’s Darfur, say doctors

  • The violence over grazing land, which was one of the root causes of a deadly war that erupted in 2003, had been relatively rare in Darfur recently

KHARTOUM: Clashes that erupted over pasture between farmers and herders in Sudan's western region of Darfur left three civilians dead on Sunday, a doctors committee linked to the country's protest movement said.
"Three citizens were killed this morning in Shengel Tobay, in North Darfur state, and another was wounded," the Central Committee of Sudan Doctors said in a statement.
Such deadly violence over grazing land, which was one of the root causes of a deadly war that erupted in 2003, had been relatively rare in Darfur recently.
The latest incident marred the first day of the Eid al-Adha Muslim feast and it was Sudan's first since months of protests brought down longtime ruler Omar al-Bashir and created an opportunity for civilian rule.
The deadly conflict that broke out more than 15 years ago in Sudan saw ethnic African rebels take up arms against Bashir's regime, which they accused of marginalising the remote region.
Khartoum armed Arab pastoralists to quash the rebellion, leading to massacres against the population that earned Bashir and others international warrants on charges of genocide.
While the fighting has subsided in Darfur, tensions over pasture remain and those responsible for the war's darkest hours have not been brought to justice.
"The former regime fuelled the conflict and contributed to deepening the crisis by not helping to provide sustainable solutions, and not holding perpetrators accountable," the doctors committee said.
Bashir was ousted in April after 30 years in power and a temporary power-sharing agreement was reached a week ago by the country's generals and protest leaders.
The document that will serve as Sudan's de facto interim constitution, however, does not mention the fate of Bashir and others wanted by the International Criminal Court over massacres in Darfur.
A key figure in Sudan's transitional authority and widely tipped as the country's new strongman was once a top leader of an Arab militia known as the Janjaweed and responsible for some of the Darfur conflict's worst atrocities.


Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

Updated 17 November 2019

Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

  • Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad
  • More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad

BAGHDAD: Iraqi protesters regained control of a third bridge leading to Baghdad’s Green Zone on Sunday, taking further ground in the biggest wave of anti-government demonstrations in decades.
Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad, part of a weeks-long attempt to disrupt traffic and reach the Green Zone housing government ministry and embassies.
Protesters made a barricade of old cabinets, trash cans and metal sheeting on the bridge while security forces took positions behind blast walls installed to prevent protesters from crossing to the other side. Protesters who choked on the tear gas were evacuated by tuk-tuk, a Reuters cameraman said.
On Saturday, Iraqi demonstrators reoccupied part of adjacent Sinak Bridge and a nearby tall building in Baghdad that security forces had pushed them away from a week before. They have held a third bridge, Jamhuriya, since October 25.
More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad and southern Iraq in early October, the largest demonstrations since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.
Protesters are demanding the overthrow of a political class seen as corrupt and beholden to foreign interests.
In Basra in the south, dozens of protesters burned tires and briefly blocked some roads on Sunday, before police managed to restore control and reopen them, police said.
The unrest has shattered the relative calm that followed the defeat of Islamic State in 2017.