Picasso exhibition lands in Beirut for the first time

Visitors enjoy Pablo Picasso’s ‘Mother and Children’ (1951) at the Sursock Museum. (AFP)
Updated 29 September 2019

Picasso exhibition lands in Beirut for the first time

  • Works by renowned Spanish artist Pablo Picasso have gone on show in Lebanon for the first time
  • The Sursock Museum collaborated with the Musée National Picasso-Paris on the exhibition, which opened on Friday

BEIRUT: Works by renowned Spanish artist Pablo Picasso have gone on show in Lebanon for the first time at an exhibition at the Sursock Museum in Beirut.

The Sursock Museum collaborated with the Musée National Picasso-Paris on the exhibition, which opened on Friday and features 20 works by the artist.

The exhibition, named “Picasso and the Family,” is part of a cultural initiative that kicked off in 2017 with a program of exhibitions across Mediterranean capitals. Beirut’s show is set to wrap up on Jan. 6.

Art lovers in the Lebanese capital will get the chance to peruse the artist’s drawings, paintings, etchings and sculptures from the period 1895-1972. The styles on show range from the artist’s realist work to his foray into Cubism.




(AFP)

Among the featured works are two paintings from two different stages of Picasso’s artistic career — the first dates back to 1921 when the pioneering artist was in the throes of Cubism, while the other dates back to 1943 and reflects the combined influences of African art and the beginning of the Surrealist movement. The two stand out as prime examples of the artist’s range and offer visitors in Lebanon a perspective on his changing styles.

This unique cultural event is funded by Daniele de Picciotto, the wife of Lebanese-Swiss banker Edgar de Picciotto, with the support of Cyril Karaoglan.

Tarek Mitri, chairman of the museum’s board, said: “This is the first time since the museum reopened that we are hosting an international artist. This will pave the way for more international exhibitions, which is evidence of Lebanon’s cultural vitality and openness to the cultures of the world.”




(AFP)

Meanwhile, Laurent Le Bon, director of the Musée National Picasso-Paris, said: “Picasso was an international artist and the presence of his paintings in Beirut reflects the importance of this capital.”

“Throughout his long years of creativity, Picasso created an art storm and a positive shock that shook the course of the European-global fine arts movement and caused a shift in art schools,” Lebanese Culture Minister Mohammad Daoud said, adding that the artist “dismantled reality and reassembled it in his paintings.”


What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

Updated 19 min 35 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

  • Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination

Racial divisions have returned to the forefront of politics in the US and European societies, making it more important than ever to understand race and racism. 

But do we? In this original and provocative book, acclaimed historian Jean-Frédéric Schaub shows that we don’t— and that we need to rethink the widespread assumption that racism is essentially a modern form of discrimination based on skin color and other visible differences.

On the contrary, Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination. Built around notions of identity and otherness, race is above all a political tool that must be understood in the context of its historical origins.

Although scholars agree that races don’t exist, they disagree about when these ideologies emerged. Drawing on historical research from the early modern period to today, Schaub makes the case that the key turning point in the political history of race in the West occurred not with the Atlantic slave trade and American slavery, as many historians have argued, but much earlier, in 15th-century Spain and Portugal, with the racialization of Christians of Jewish and Muslim origin.