Kendall Jenner, Fai Khadra pair up for Bieber wedding

Kendall Jenner attended the wedding of the season this week. (AFP)
Updated 06 October 2019

Kendall Jenner, Fai Khadra pair up for Bieber wedding

DUBAI: US model Kendall Jenner set the rumor mill alight this week when she attended the much buzzed about Bieber wedding alongside part-Palestinian DJ and influencer Fai Khadra this week.

The pair have been spotted together on more than a few occasions in recent months, causing media outlets and fans alike to suspect they are a couple.

The pair have sparked romance rumors in the past, but this week’s wedding could simply be a case of two friends celebrating a star-studded wedding.

“We don’t date, he’s just my date,” Jenner jokingly posted on Instagram, alongside a mirror selfie in which she poses in front of Khadra.




Kendall Jenner and Fai Khadra posed for a selfie. (Instagram)

Khadra is the brother of DJ twin sisters Sama and Haya Khadra, who are regularly spotted with the Kardashian-Jenner clan.

In September, Kendall teased her online fans by sending a sweet birthday wish to Khadra and in July, the pair was photographed wearing matching outfits at the Wimbledon men’s final tennis match.

They looked summer-ready in matching blue shirts and white bottoms.

Fast forward to this week and the pair looked dashing at the wedding of the season — Justin Bieber and his childhood sweetheart Hailey Baldwin tied the knot for a second time on Monday at a ceremony for family and friends at a hotel resort in South Carolina.

 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

we don’t date he’s just my date

A post shared by Kendall (@kendalljenner) on

People magazine and E! News, citing sources close to the couple, said the pair exchanged vows in a religious ceremony attended by their parents and celebrities including Ed Sheeran, Kylie and Kendall Jenner, Usher and Baldwin’s actor uncle Alec Baldwin.

 

Reuters reported that representatives of the pair did not return requests for comment on Monday but celebrity media and paparazzi have been closely following the two days of celebrations at the Montage Palmetto Bluff resort.

People magazine said the couple exchanged vows as the sun set at a chapel on the resort, in front of about 150 guests.

Bieber and Baldwin first married in an under the radar civil ceremony in New York in September last year.

The Canadian singer, 25, and model Baldwin, 22, first met in their early teens and started dating again seriously about two years ago.


‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging. (Supplied)
Updated 23 October 2019

‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

MUMBAI: Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven,” which was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival, is pure cinema. Like his earlier works, here too the Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, this time to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging.

He says people worldwide now live in fear amid global geopolitical tensions. Today, checkpoints are just about everywhere: In airports, shopping malls, cinemas, highways — the list is endless.

“It Must Be Heaven” was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival. (Supplied) 

Suleiman’s earlier features, such as “Chronicle of a Disappearance” and “Divine Intervention,” showed us everyday life in the occupied Palestinian territories. This time, it is Paris and New York. 

The first scene is hilarious, with a bishop trying to enter a church with his followers. The gatekeeper on the other side of the heavy wooden door is probably too intoxicated and refuses to let the priest in, leading to a comical situation. Suleiman’s life in Nazareth is filled with such incidents — snippets that have been strung together to tell us of tension in society. Neighbors turn out to be selfish, and only generous when they know they are being watched. 

The Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. (Supplied)

In Paris, the cafes along the grand boulevards, and the young women who pass by, are typical of France’s capital. But a cut to Bastille Day, with tanks rolling by in a show of strength, jolts us back to harsh reality. In New York, Suleiman’s cab driver is excited at driving a Palestinian. 

The film has an interesting way of storytelling. The scenes begin as observational shots, but the camera quickly changes positions to show Suleiman watching from the other side of the room or a street. The camera then returns to where it first stood, and this back-and-forth movement is delightfully engaging.

The framing is so perfect, and the colors so bright and beautiful, that each scene looks magical. And as the director looks on at all this with his usual deadpan expression, a sardonic twitch at the corner of his mouth, we know all this is but illusion. There is bitter truth ahead!