Saudi Arabia’s Al-Ahsa projects highlighted at UNESCO meeting

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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
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Saudi artisans exhibit their skills during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa. (SPA)
Updated 18 October 2019

Saudi Arabia’s Al-Ahsa projects highlighted at UNESCO meeting

AL-AHSA: The creative and cultural achievements of Al-Ahsa Oasis were highlighted by its mayor at a UNESCO meeting in Japan, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

Al-Ahsa is widely considered to have the greenest and most fertile land in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province, while also housing prominent archaeological and historical sites.

Al-Ahsa Mayor Adel Al-Mulhim, head of the Saudi Creative Al-Ahsa delegation to the annual meeting of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network held in Kanazawa, Japan, provided a detailed presentation on Al-Ahsa’s achievements such as becoming a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2018, becoming a member of the Creative Cities Network in the field of handicrafts and folk arts in 2015, and being named as Arab Tourism Capital for 2019 by the Arab Ministerial Council for Tourism.

The meeting was attended by Mayor of Kanazawa Yukiyoshi Yamano, along with representatives from 30 countries.

Al-Mulhim reviewed projects and events in Al-Ahsa aimed at promoting cultural activities in line with the creative network’s objectives, which include making cities safer and more sustainable. 




Saudi artists perform a dance number during a recent festival in Al-Ahsa, in the Eastern Povince of Saudi Arabia. (SPA)

He said government support for Al-Ahsa’s heritage and creative sectors had led to a increased public awareness about the importance of culture and creativity in shaping a sustainable city, and achieving the goals of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network to emphasize the role of culture in sustainable urban development.

Al-Mulhim said that Al-Ahsa had several elements that qualified it as a member of the network, a first for the Kingdom and Gulf Cooperation Council states.

“These elements include the cultural depth of Al-Ahsa in the Arabian Gulf region, owning a rich heritage of crafts and folklore, its environmental and social diversity, and having the required infrastructure to actively participate in national, regional and international events,” he told the meeting.


Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo/Shutterstock
Updated 19 October 2020

Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage

JEDDAH: Splashes of pink are appearing in Saudi Arabia’s public spaces to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screening.
A number of campaigns are underway this month to support this outreach — in malls, on the street and on billboards.
Pamphlets are being handed out, videos and interactive pictures are on display, there are fundraising activities such as hiking and biking, and medical students have been talking to shoppers and passers-by as part of efforts to increase people’s knowledge.
In Jeddah there was a Tai Chi class on the city’s waterfront, headed by Amatallah Bahaziq, that was attended by female members of Bliss Runners and Bolts. Another event was a bike ride organized by Jeddah Cyclists that included men and women.
A number of major cities across the Kingdom have also seen pop-up campaigns, with specialists ready to answer questions and play a proactive role in spreading proper knowledge and information about the disease, its detection and the chances of survival when detected early.

HIGHLIGHT

According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.

The Zahra Breast Cancer Association is one of Saudi Arabia’s leading organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the disease. It has been supporting cancer patients and survivors and normalizing conversations about breast cancer among the community, with a renewed emphasis during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
“Given the circumstances (due to the pandemic) we focused our efforts to raise awareness to the importance of early detection virtually,” a representative from the association told Arab News. “With billboards and visuals spread across Saudi cities, we’re still following through with our campaign promise to raise awareness each year and send the message across: Early detection will save your life.”
According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.