How Chrissy Teigen was inspired by her Moroccan meals

Chrissy Teigen took to Instagram late on Monday to show off her latest kitchenware product, which was inspired by a trip to Morocco. (AFP)
Updated 22 October 2019

How Chrissy Teigen was inspired by her Moroccan meals

DUBAI: Social media darling, model and queen of sassy clap backs on Twitter, Chrissy Teigen took to Instagram late on Monday to show off her latest kitchenware product, which was inspired by a trip to Morocco.

The model has a cookware range with US retailer Target called the “Cravings by Chrissy Teigen” collection and she just launched the latest product — a mid-sized tagine.

“My new tagine is here!! This is just like a Dutch oven, so you can make stews (or chili — this is John’s recipe). They remind me of my trips to Morocco and look pretty cool in the kitchen,” Teigen posted alongside a video of her cooking chili in the tagine, referring to her husband John Legend.

Teigen last visited the North African country in January and took to social media to document her trip, including a relatable post about her love of Moroccan cuisine.

 

“Gained seven pounds in 2.5 days. Love you, Marrakech,” she posted on Twitter on Jan. 27 about her 3.2kg weight gain due to the country’s famously delicious treats.

 

Teigen was in Morocco to take part in a photoshoot for what she described as a “top secret project,” but the mother-of-two and TV show host took time out to enjoy the sights and sounds Marrakesh has to offer.

She explored Moroccan markets, went on a camel ride and indulged in local cuisine.

Morocco has become a playground for the world’s rich and famous, with plenty of international celebrities flocking to its history-steeped cities for high-end holidays.

 

In November, US model and actress Emily Ratajkowski shared snaps of her holiday in Morocco on social media.

 

The model was in Marrakech and seemed to have been taken in by the stunning souks and views the city has to offer.

Ratajkowski posted a photograph on Instagram where she is gazing out over the city’s rooftops, captioning it “Marrakech moonrise.”

In October 2018, Halle Berry shared from her stay in Morocco with her millions of Instagram followers, including one snap in which she rides a camel. The 52-year-old posted a string of photos of her time in the country, including a snap of a souk — which she captioned “Khamssas in the Souk” — and one in which she posed with a cat.


Lebanese concept store Dikkeni gives back through art, fashion

Dikkeni aims to supports the creative industry in Lebanon. (Instagram)
Updated 19 September 2020

Lebanese concept store Dikkeni gives back through art, fashion

DUBAI: Founded in London, online concept store Dikkeni is home to a number of established and up-and-coming Lebanese artists, designers and creative talents who sell their wares through the platform, which in turn ensures all net proceeds made from consumer purchases go directly to artists, brands and local NGOs.

Launched under the Lebanese non-profit organization Impact Lebanon, Dikkeni aims to supports the creative industry in Lebanon.

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New on Dikkéni // @alexandrahakim, hand-crafted sustainable and unique jewellery. #straightfromthestudio - Alexandra Hakim’s collections give a new lease of life to found materials and objects which would otherwise go to waste. Inspirations as varied as tomato stems from Beirut’s bustling markets and spent matchsticks found at home are repurposed into striking, contemporary pieces of jewellery. Spearheading sustainability long before it became a trend, each of Alexandra Hakim’s pieces are meticulously made by hand, completely unique and naturally zero-waste. - Photography: @alexandrahakim #dikkeni #sustainable #conscious #sustainablelifestyle #sustainableliving #sustainabledesign #socialenterprise #craftsmanship #lebanon #madeinlebanon #beirut #alexandrahakim #jewellery #handcrafted

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Launched this summer, co-founder Daniella Chartouni spoke to Arab News about the aims of the website.

“Our primary interest is in supporting the designers and making sure that they can continue to produce. Our secondary interest is offering the relief to Lebanon that it needs” — something that is a key concern after the Aug. 4 explosion that ripped through Beirut.

Dikkeni launched in May after the founders felt the need to support the creative industry in their country.

A lot of designers, small businesses and artists in Lebanon have stopped producing due to inflation, Chartouni explained. “No one is buying in Lebanon so, it’s a very tough situation, and the creative industry is one of Lebanon’s best industries.” 

She also added that the street protests which occurred in Lebanon in 2019 constituted “a big time” for Lebanese artists. “They got very inspired by the change happening in the country. So, it was a great way to launch.”

The online platform recently launched their second collection. They partnered with non-profit organization Lebanon Needs, whose focus is healthcare and providing medication, products which Chartouni believes are very difficult to secure during the current situation.

Dikkeni is currently featuring eight artists and designers, who produce sustainable products in diverse art forms, like jewelry, home decor, photography, fashion and more. 

When speaking to Tina Mouheb, one of the UK-based artists who is currently working with Dikkeni, she said that this project is of great importance to her. 

“Firstly, it is my first ‘public’ art display which allows me – as a humble, uprising, socially conscious artist – to start finding my voice,” the designer and former landscape architect told Arab News. “Another reason is the timing of such initiative in the midst of (the) chaos in Lebanon. The need to help local Lebanese NGOs is imperative.”