Review: The latest ‘Call of Duty’ is all about moral warfare

Updated 27 October 2019

Review: The latest ‘Call of Duty’ is all about moral warfare

DUBAI: Call of Duty is a name all gamers are familiar with — a video game series that has traditionally told a story with over-the-top action and cinematics.

The story behind 2019’s Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, released on Oct. 25, does the exact opposite of that, instead choosing to put players in a difficult position of moving them from a movie to an imitation of real-world events, albeit fictionalized, but nonetheless intended to make them feel responsible for their actions.

Gamers were invited to preview the game at Dubai’s Skydive Desert Dropzone to experience the ambience of Modern Warfare’s Middle Eastern setting on Thursday.




For the first time, Call of Duty supports cross-platform multiplayers. (Supplied)

After missing a campaign from the series in Black Ops 4, Modern Warfare’s storytelling explores what war really is and players will have to watch deeply unsettling and uncomfortable scenes with some shock and awe imagery. The message is clear — war is not a game. It is an excellent story that brings back some old favorite characters and brings women into the heart of conflict.

There are several modes in Call of Duty: Modern Warefare’s multiplayer arsenal, the main reason why a lot of its massive fan base will buy the title. The publisher and developer have been praised for breaking away from the mold, amid a sea of battle-royale games such as Fortnite.




Women feature heavily in the game. (Supplied)

For the first time, Call of Duty supports cross-platform multiplayers allowing players to join their friends across PC, Xbox One and Playstation 4. They have also promised that to some degree, traditional micro transaction mechanics such as loot boxes or season passes have been removed.

Publisher Activision, however, has included a “Survival” mode that is exclusive to the Playstation 4 for a year. This is a move that some may find disingenuous, given how much emphasis has been made to deliver the complete experience to everyone, regardless of the platform.

The multiplayer pushes you to be quick on your fingers and check your surroundings constantly — as I learnt the hard way. The mode I enjoyed the most is Gunfight, that’s a 2 vs 2 player mode; both teams start with the same level field and the matches are fast paced. I see this mode being the most popular among the traditional options it offers.




The multiplayer pushes you to be quick on your fingers and check your surroundings constantly. (Supplied)

 


A day at the races: Stylish guests wow at the Saudi Cup

Entrepreneur and influencer Pierette Yammine showed off a regal, ice blue number by Dubai-based label Baruni Fashion. (Huda Bashatah/Arab News)
Updated 1 min 1 sec ago

A day at the races: Stylish guests wow at the Saudi Cup

RIYADH: All eyes were on Saudi Arabia as the world’s most valuable horse race kicked off over the weekend — and there was something for everyone, including fashion fans.

Style-lovers descended on the Saudi Cup in Riyadh wearing their race day best, with women giving Audrey Hepburn’s character in Hollywood classic “My Fair Lady” a run for her money with their chic abayas and colorful dresses.

Stylish racing gear was on full display in the form of an array of creative headpieces flaunted by some women in the Red Sea Pavilion.

Arab News caught up with Evelyn McDermott, founder of the Evelyn McDermott Millinery, which was the exclusive milliner for the Saudi Cup and had a dedicated booth for those who wanted to pick up a last-minute headpiece.

Milliner Evelyn McDermott (right) boasted a dark green jumpsuit with a signature headpiece. (Huda Bashatah/Arab News)

“My brand is a Dubai-born brand and I’ve been making the hats for about seven to eight years now, she said, before adding, “it’s been the most phenomenal thing ever to be invited here to Saudi Arabia (and) to be the exclusive milliner to the Saudi Cup has just been so wonderful. I mean the first ever Saudi Cup makes it an experience that can never be repeated so it’s been fantastic.”

For her part, McDermott capitalized on one of the style trends of the day — wearing green.

The designer donned a jade green jumpsuit with dramatic tulip sleeves in translucent chiffon and finished off her out-there outfit with a matching head wrap — a fresh take on typical race day headpieces and the feathered looks preferred by many other women at the event.

Green seemed to be a popular color, with many style conscious race goers donning various shades of the hue.

Michele Fischer, who flew into the Kingdom from the US, showed off an embroidered blue abaya, complete with tribal designs in white threadwork. Underneath, she boasted a fern green cocktail dress by Ralph Lauren and topped off the look with an ash-and-ebony feathered headpiece by Australian milliner Sonlia Fashion.

Michele Fischer showed off a fern green number. (Huda Bashatah/Arab News)

Fischer told Arab News she handpicked the dark green dress in order to pay tribute to Saudi Arabia.

Meanwhile, entrepreneur and influencer Pierette Yammine showed off a regal, ice blue number by Dubai-based label Baruni Fashion, which is helmed by former petroleum engineer-turned-designer Fadwa Baruni.

Entrepreneur Pierette Yammine showed off a regal, ice blue number by Dubai-based label Baruni Fashion. (Huda Bashatah/Arab News)

Yammine accessorized the floor-grazing gown, with it’s textured cuffed sleeves and sash at the waist, with a demure white Longines watch and an attention-grabbing caramel-colored floral headpiece with wispy filaments that played in the breeze.

Attendee Liz Price followed suit and opted for a gorgeous, crinkled headpiece that resembled piled up gardenias atop her sleek hairdo. The cream-colored piece was designed by London-based milliner Rachel Trevor Morgan, whose hats are favored by Queen Elizabeth II.

Liz Price's The cream-colored piece was designed by London-based milliner Rachel Trevor Morgan. (Arab News)