Saudi Aramco IPO subscriptions reach SR73bn in first 5 days

Institutional subscriptions in the first five days reached SR58.39 billion. (Reuters/File photo)
Updated 26 November 2019

Saudi Aramco IPO subscriptions reach SR73bn in first 5 days

  • Institutional subscriptions in the first five days reached SR58.39 billion
  • Retail subscriptions during this period totalled SR14.59 billion

RIYADH: Institutional tranche and retail subscriptions to Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering have reached almost SR73 billion in less than a week, Samba Capital Vice-Chairman Rania Nashar said on Thursday.

“Retail and Institutional subscription levels for the first five days of the offering have reached an unprecedented scale, demonstrating the confidence of investors in Saudi Aramco, and we anticipate further increases in subscription levels during the remainder of the offering period,” she said.

Institutional subscriptions amounted to SR58.4 billion and 1.8 billion total subscribed shares. Retail subscriptions were worth SR14.6 billion, representing 1.8 million subscribers and 465 million total subscribed shares.




Samba Capital Vice-Chairman Rania Nashar

Earlier, it was announced that the Kingdom will sell 3 billion shares in Aramco during its stock market launch — representing about 1.5 percent of the total — at a valuation between SR30 ($8) and SR32 a share. This gives the business a total valuation of between $1.6 and $1.7 trillion, making it the most valuable company in history.

Investment professionals welcomed the valuation, which was below than the highest estimates of Aramco’s worth, as a “compromise” between the Kingdom and the financial world.

Setting a price range and the number of shares to be sold starts a “book-building” process during which Aramco and its advisers will consult potential investors and await bids from institutions and private investors to help decide at what price the shares will be sold. The final pricing decision will be announced on Dec. 5, with trading expected to start on the Tadawul shortly after.


China's aviation regulator raised concerns with Boeing on 737 MAX design changes

Updated 12 December 2019

China's aviation regulator raised concerns with Boeing on 737 MAX design changes

  • China is reviewing the airworthiness of the plane
  • China was first country to ground plane in March

BEIJING: China’s aviation regulator raised “important concerns” with Boeing Co. on the reliability and security of design changes to the grounded 737 MAX, it said on Thursday, but declined to comment on when the plane might fly again in China.
China is reviewing the airworthiness of the plane based on proposed changes to software and flight control systems according to a bilateral agreement with the United States, Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) spokesman Liu Luxu told reporters at a monthly briefing.
He reiterated that for the plane to resume flights in China, it needed to be re-certified, pilots needed comprehensive and effective training to restore confidence in the model and the causes of two crashes that killed 346 people needed to be investigated with effective measures put in place to prevent another one.
China was the first country to ground the 737 MAX after the second crash in Ethiopia in March and had set up a task force to review design changes to the aircraft that Boeing had submitted.
The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not allow the 737 MAX to resume flying before the end of 2019, its chief, Steve Dickson, said on Wednesday.
Once the FAA approves the reintroduction into service, the 737 MAX can operate in the United States, but individual regulators could keep the planes grounded in other countries until they complete their own reviews.
“Due to the trade war, the jury is still out on when China would reintroduce the aircraft,” said Rob Morris, Global Head of Consultancy at Ascend by Cirium.
Chinese airlines had 97 737 MAX jets in operation before the global grounding, the most of any country, according to Cirium Fleets Analyzer.