Suhail Abanmi, governor of Saudi Arabia’s General Authority of Zakat and Tax

Suhail Abanmi
Updated 04 December 2019

Suhail Abanmi, governor of Saudi Arabia’s General Authority of Zakat and Tax

  • Abanmi obtained his bachelor’s degree in computer science with honors from King Saud University in 2000
  • He began his career as a project manager for MeduNet from 2000 to 2004

Suhail Abanmi has been governor of the General Authority of Zakat and Tax since June 2017.

Abanmi obtained his bachelor’s degree in computer science with honors from King Saud University in 2000, and his master’s degree in computer engineering from the University of New South Wales in Australia in 2007, followed by a master’s of business in accounting and finance in 2014 from Alfaisal University.

He began his career as a project manager for MeduNet from 2000 to 2004 before becoming a service planning manager at Alinma Bank in 2007. In 2009, he joined the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul) as head of business development and manager of the Tadawulaty program. He then headed the business excellence and corporate strategy and planning group with Al-Rajhi Bank.

Abanmi became an adviser to the Minister of Commerce and Investment in 2013 while acting as director-general of the Qawaem program for the ministry. Three years later, he became deputy minister for internal trade.

Between 2016 and 2017, Abanmi sat on the board of many organizations, including the Small and Medium Enterprises General Authority, Saudi Organization for Certified Public Accountants, the General Authority for Statistics and the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority.

He was chairman of Bayan Credit Bureau and sat on the advisory committee for the Capital Market Authority until March 2019. He is currently a member of the board of Tadawul. On the fifth anniversary of King Salman’s ascension to the throne, Abanmi congratulated the king, and praised the progress and development taking place in the Kingdom.

“We have every right to take pride in what has been achieved on this path of renewal paved by King Salman, and we should recall the gigantic developments we are witnessing,” he said.


US denies banning dates from Saudi Arabia

Updated 15 min 39 sec ago

US denies banning dates from Saudi Arabia

  • There has been no FDA ban on dates from Saudi Arabia, the administration told Arab News

RIYADH: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has denied that it banned the import of dates from Saudi Arabia, following media reports that it had done so earlier this week.

“There has been no FDA ban on dates from Saudi Arabia,” the administration told Arab News. The Saudi National Center for Palms & Dates (NCPD) also denied the reports.

The NCPD pointed out that reports published mentioned the finding of pesticide residues in date samples from a Saudi company dating back to 2009.

In a statement on Sunday, the NCPD said that the US FDA published on its website a list of all the companies “classified by country” which did not meet US standards.

It added that the FDA required companies to update their information with it as and when that changed.

Bashar Al-Quraya, deputy chairman of the Dates Committee of Al-Qassim Chamber of Commerce, told Arab News that the information did not come from reliable sources. “We did not see any real official statements,” he said.

The center stressed that they work with the relevant authorities to raise the level of date safety in general for products sold in local or export markets.

“Saudi Arabia is considered number one in date quality,” Al-Quraya said, adding that when they export dates to Germany and the UK, the entry procedures go very smoothly. “There are no problems and the procedures are very simple and clear.”

Al-Quraya also pointed out that for the last two months of growth before harvesting the crop, no pesticides are sprayed on Saudi dates, and the exported fruits are subjected to tests before shipping.

“The rumors did not affect the market. I am now at the food fair in Dubai, there is a great demand for Saudi dates from European countries,” he said.

“If there was a problem with our dates the news should come from the UK or Germany, as the number of dates we export (there) are much bigger than what we export to the US,” he added.