Body of slain doctor arrives in Japan after Afghan shooting

Airport workers bow to pay respect to the coffin of late Japanese doctor Tetsu Nakamura at Narita International Airport in Chiba, Japan on Sunday December 8, 2019. (Kyodo via Reuters)
Updated 08 December 2019

Body of slain doctor arrives in Japan after Afghan shooting

  • Beloved Japanese doctor was killed in Jalalabad, the main city in the eastern province of Nangarhar where he had worked since the 1980s

NARITA, Japan: The body of Tetsu Nakamura, a beloved Japanese doctor who was shot to death in Afghanistan after decades of his earnest support for the country, was brought back to Japan on Sunday.
A plane carrying his body landed at Narita airport near Tokyo with his wife and eldest daughter, who visited Kabul after Wednesday’s murder.
Vice foreign minister Keisuke Suzuki and other attendants, including his wife, offered a silent prayer at the airport after placing bouquets on his casket wrapped by a white sheet.
His body will be transferred to the western Japanese city of Fukuoka, his hometown, on Monday, local media said.
The 73-year-old was killed in Jalalabad, the main city in the eastern province of Nangarhar where he had worked since the 1980s.
He was killed along with five Afghan guards and colleagues in an attack no-one has yet claimed, and which the Taliban condemned.
Even in a country inured to brutal violence and daily bloodshed, the killing of Nakamura, who transformed barren expanses of eastern Afghanistan and spent decades caring for the sick, came as a horrifying shock to many Afghans.
Ahead of his body’s departure from Kabul, Afghan officials, led by President Ashraf Ghani, attended a ceremony at an airport to mourn for the death of Nakamura, who became an honorary citizen of his adopted home.


Singapore confirms first case of Wuhan virus

Updated 23 January 2020

Singapore confirms first case of Wuhan virus

Singapore Thursday confirmed its first case of the new SARS-like virus which has killed 17 people in China and spread to multiple countries including the United States.
The Ministry of Health (MOH) said the patient was a 66-year-old man from Wuhan who arrived in Singapore with his family on Monday.
He was immediately isolated after arriving at a hospital with a fever and cough, and test results later confirmed he was infected with the coronavirus.
One of his traveling companions, a 37-year-old man from Wuhan, has also been admitted to hospital as a suspect case.
Prior to admission, they had stayed at a hotel on the resort island of Sentosa, the ministry said.
It added that Singapore was expecting more cases and alarms “given the high volume of international travel.”
Moreover, tourists leaving Bangkok for China said on Thursday they were worried about the spread of the Wuhan virus, ahead of more air and train travel in the lead-up to the Lunar New Year holidays.
China has placed Wuhan, a city of 11 million, on lockdown, as it is considered the epicenter of a new coronavirus outbreak that has killed 17 and infected nearly 600.
Thailand has so far confirmed four cases of coronavirus, the largest number outside China. Two of the cases were Chinese women who have since been allowed to return home. Chinese tourists make up the largest group of visitors to Thailand.
At Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi airport, masked visitors lined up as usual to check in for Southern China Airlines flights back to China.
AirAsia said on Thursday it has canceled direct flights between Wuhan and cities in Thailand and Malaysia until Jan 28.
Matt Thomas, who lives in the Chinese city of Xian, said he was worried about the new Chinese virus, especially because he once contracted swine flu which he described as “awful.”
“I’m a bit worried that it will repeat. I have just got to be safe. In these sorts of situations, you know, take everything seriously, don’t take any risks,” Thomas said.
Chinese health officials fear the transmission rate will accelerate, as hundreds of millions of Chinese travel at home and abroad during week-long holidays for the Lunar New Year.