Lebanon’s Georges Hobeika dazzles couture lovers in Paris

The Théâtre National de Chaillot in Paris served as the backdrop for the new couture offering. (AFP)
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Updated 21 January 2020

Lebanon’s Georges Hobeika dazzles couture lovers in Paris

  • The collection at Georges Hobeika's show came with exquisite, well-placed embroidery in a rich palette of neutrals and playful tones, as well as luxurious materials such as satin duchesse and silk chiffon

PARIS: For Spring 2020, Lebanese couturier Georges Hobeika transported his jam-packed front row, that included Dubai-based influencer Hala Abdullah and Lebanese television presenter Diala Makki, to the idyllic shores of Sardinia, Italy.




Hobeika’s newest offering features plenty of feminine and bold designs set to take over the red carpets to come. (AFP)

The Théâtre National de Chaillot in Paris served as the backdrop for the new couture offering, which was a reflection of Hobeika’s favorite inspirations: “The force of nature,” “the ecstasy of freedom” and the “philosophy of entertainment,” according to the show notes.




The collection also came with exquisite, well-placed embroidery in a rich palette of neutrals and playful tones. (AFP)

The first look, a black crochet minidress adorned with oversized yellow and lavender flowers, set the tone for the lineup of sequined evening gowns, voluminous skirts and heavily-embellished tops that followed.




Hobeika's metallic gown with crystals and sequins is fit for a princess.(AFP)

Some of the looks were paired with oversized hats that served as a nod to the umbrellas that line the shores of sunny Italian beaches.




Some of the looks were paired with oversized hats that served as a nod to the umbrellas that line the shores of sunny Italian beaches. (AFP)

The collection also came with exquisite, well-placed embroidery in a rich palette of neutrals and playful tones, as well as luxurious materials such as satin duchesse and silk chiffon — elements that have made the Baskinta-born designer revered by the royals and red carpet stars that make up his loyal clientele.




Celebrities constantly turn to Hobeika to dress them in his show-stopping creations for some of their most important events. (AFP)

Indeed, celebrities constantly turn to Hobeika to dress them in his show-stopping creations for some of their most important events. Case in point: Singer-turned-actress Jennifer Lopez who chose an elegant off-the-shoulder black gown for the 2020 Screen Actors Guild Awards on Monday and before that, a cream-colored, backless gown encrusted with gems at the 2020 Critics’ Choice Awards earlier this month.




Georges Hobeika's show featured his Spring 2020 collection. (AFP)

With awards season in full swing, Hobeika’s newest offering features plenty of feminine and bold designs set to take over the red carpets to come. 




Singer-turned-actress Jennifer Lopez was the latest to champion Hobeika’s designs. 

There was a pink, heavily-embellished top paired with a purple crochet skirt and a black oversized bow, a romantic floral-printed blazer that boasted sequined lapels, a long-sleeved gown drenched in black and pink ombre crystals, a metallic minidress embellished with thousands of tiny crystals and sequins and a hot pink ball gown that featured floral appliques on the bodice and feather fringed pouf sleeves. 




Hobeika also offered brides-to-be something to dream about. (AFP)

Meanwhile, Hobeika also offered brides-to-be something to dream about in the form of a metallic gown with crystals and sequins that’s fit for a princess.


UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, Kathryn Jones learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region. (Shutterstock)
Updated 25 May 2020

UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

DUBAI: Skincare products can quite often sit on shelfs or in delivery vehicles for weeks and months, stored in unsuitable conditions.

And despite brands promoting them as organic and natural, some customers might question the effectiveness of products left lying around for long periods after being produced.

However, Kathryn Jones, founder of the UAE-based brand Kathryn Jones Hand Blended Serums, or KJ Serums for short, told Arab News how her company created fresh products every month for customers.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.” (Supplied)

“The concept of a freshly-made skincare serum is something quite different and our customers have really embraced it. They appreciate it’s a fresh product that must be used up within a month when it’s at its most active and effective and repurchased – almost like a food stuff,” she said.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.”

She added: “I simply could not afford the prices of some of the top skincare brands but still wanted excellent results.”

With her background in the biopharmaceuticals industry, she started experimenting and developing her own formulas. “The core proposition is ‘hand blended’ because that’s how it all started, by hand blending and perfecting the serum formulas myself here in the UAE,” she said.

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, the entrepreneur learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region.

“Our climate here is extreme often for eight months or more of the year, especially in the Gulf region. A lot our customers will ask for a product that reduces oiliness and sheen on the skin and are reluctant to purchase products that contain a lot of oils, or are very heavily moisturizing,” Jones added.

The businesswoman believes the Middle East market is “wonderfully diverse” with different attitudes and expectations toward skincare products.

“Of course, this is a challenge to develop effective products which can address many different skin types and issues, but the market is truly receptive to new concepts,” she said.

Jones pointed out that with the current lockdown situation due to the ongoing spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), people had more time to care for their skin.

“The coronavirus pandemic has obviously confined us to our homes, and, given the steady increase in the number of enquiries we are receiving, it suggests consumers currently have more time to consider their online skincare purchases and perhaps have more time to invest in an effective routine,” she said.

On whether the COVID-19 outbreak would change the future of the skincare industry, Jones added: “I think that many consumers, either through necessity or out of a desire to support local brands might have chosen to source their products from different manufacturers and therefore brand loyalties may have been affected to a certain extent.”