What We Are Reading Today: An Internet for the People by Jessa Lingel

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Updated 07 February 2020

What We Are Reading Today: An Internet for the People by Jessa Lingel

Begun by Craig Newmark as an email to some friends about cool events happening around San Francisco, craigslist is now the leading classifieds service on the planet. 

It is also a throwback to the early internet. The website has barely seen an upgrade since it launched in 1996. There are no banner ads. The company doesn’t profit off your data. 

An Internet for the People explores how people use craigslist to buy and sell, find work, and find love — and reveals why craigslist is becoming a lonely outpost in an increasingly corporatized web, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Drawing on interviews with craigslist insiders and ordinary users, Jessa Lingel looks at the site’s history and values, showing how it has mostly stayed the same while the web around it has become more commercial and far less open.  She examines craigslist’s legal history, describing the company’s courtroom battles over issues of freedom of expression and data privacy, and explains the importance of locality in the social relationships fostered by the site. 


What We Are Reading Today: The Deportation Machine by Adam Goodman

Updated 01 June 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Deportation Machine by Adam Goodman

Constant headlines about deportations, detention camps, and border walls drive urgent debates about immigration and what it means to be an American in the 21st century. The Deportation Machine traces the long and troubling history of the US government’s systematic efforts to terrorize and expel immigrants over the past 140 years. 

This provocative, eye-opening book provides needed historical perspective on one of the most pressing social and political issues of our time.

In a sweeping and engaging narrative, Adam Goodman examines how federal, state, and local officials have targeted various groups for expulsion, from Chinese and Europeans at the turn of the twentieth century to Central Americans and Muslims today. 

He reveals how authorities have singled out Mexicans, nine out of ten of all deportees, and removed most of them not by orders of immigration judges but through coercive administrative procedures and calculated fear campaigns. Goodman uncovers the machine’s three primary mechanisms—formal deportations, “voluntary” departures and self-deportations.