Dubai arrests notorious British gang leader

Craig Martin Moran has a long history of criminal activity. (Dubai Police)
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Updated 30 July 2020

Dubai arrests notorious British gang leader

  • Craig Martin Moran was arrested by the police after a Red Notice was issued by Interpol
  • He was extradited to the UK after his case was referred to Dubai’s public prosecution

DUBAI: A British national wanted for drug and weapons trafficking in the United Kingdom has been arrested in Dubai, the police said in a statement on Wednesday.

Craig Martin Moran was arrested by the police after a Red Notice was issued by Interpol, UAE daily The National reported. Moran is the leader of Colin Gunn, a notorious gang in the UK.

Khalil Ibrahm Al-Mansouri, assistant commander of criminal investigation affairs at Dubai police, said they set up a task force to catch Moran, in coordination with British authorities.

He said artificial intelligence was used to locate the gang leader and “closely observe” his movements before the arrest.

“He was inside his car after leaving his Dubai residence when the force team members raided his car and were able to control and arrest him,” Dubai’s Criminal Investigation Department chief Jamal Al-Jalaf said.

Moran has a long record of criminal offenses, including armed robbery and drug dealing, and was first imprisoned at the age of 16.

He was extradited to the UK after his case was referred to Dubai’s public prosecution.


‘Political paralysis’: Lebanese patriarch points at Shiite leaders for cabinet delay

Updated 1 min 12 sec ago

‘Political paralysis’: Lebanese patriarch points at Shiite leaders for cabinet delay

  • Prime Minister-designate Mustapha Adib, a Sunni Muslim, wants to appoint specialists and shake up the leadership of ministries
  • Sunday’s sermon adds to tensions in a nation facing its worst crisis since a civil war ended in 1990

BEIRUT: Lebanon’s top Christian cleric took a swipe at leaders of the Shiite Muslim community on Sunday for making demands he said were blocking the formation of a new government and causing political paralysis in a nation in deep crisis.
Patriarch Bechara Boutros Al-Rai, leader of the Maronite church, did not mention Shiites directly but asked how one sect can demand “a certain ministry.” Shiite politicians have said they must name the finance minister.
Sunday’s sermon adds to tensions in a nation facing its worst crisis since a civil war ended in 1990 and where power is traditionally shared out between Muslims and Christians.
France has been pushing Lebanon to form a new cabinet fast. But a deadline of Sept. 15 that politicians told Paris they would meet has been missed amid a row over appointments, notably the finance minister, a post Shiites controlled for years.
Shiite politicians say they must choose some posts because rivals are trying to use “foreign leverage” to push them aside.
“In what capacity does a sect demand a certain ministry as if it is its own, and obstruct the formation of the government, until it achieves its goals, and so causes political paralysis?” the patriarch of Lebanon’s biggest Christian community said.
He said the Taif agreement, a pact that ended the 1975-1990 civil war, did not hand specific ministries to specific sects.
Prime Minister-designate Mustapha Adib, a Sunni Muslim, wants to appoint specialists and shake up the leadership of ministries.
The main Shiite groups — the Amal Movement and the heavily armed, Iranian-backed Hezbollah — want to select the figures to fill several posts, including the finance minister, a vital position as Lebanon navigates through its economic crisis.
A French roadmap for Lebanon includes the swift resumption of talks with the International Monetary Fund, a first step to helping deal with a mountain of debt and fix Lebanon’s broken banking sector. But it first needs a government.