Saudi Arabia, Bahrain welcome Guatemala, Estonia moves against Hezbollah

Supporters of the Lebanese Shiite movements Hezbollah and Amal chant as they protest a statement made by the US ambassador criticising the former group, at a rally in the southern suburb of the capital Beirut, on June 28, 2020. (File/AFP)
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Updated 26 October 2020

Saudi Arabia, Bahrain welcome Guatemala, Estonia moves against Hezbollah

  • Manama also commended the two countries’ decision to impose sanctions against members of Hezbollah

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia and Bahrain separately welcomed Guatemala and Estonia’s decisions against Hezbollah, a heavily armed and a dominant military and political force in Lebanon.
Saudi Arabia particularly welcomed Guatemala’s designation of Hezbollah as a terrorist organization, and Estonia’s decision to impose sanctions on the group and prevent entry of members into its territories, state news agency SPA reported.
Meanwhile, Manama also commended the two countries’ decision to impose sanctions against members of the Shiite group.
The Trump administration last month also intensified sanctions on the Iran-backed Lebanese militant group and institutions linked to it to unprecedented levels, targeting lawmakers and allies of the group for the first time.
The significant steps taken by Guatemala and Estonia their keenness to confront extremist organizations and stop their activities, state news agency BNA reported, quoting Bahrain’s foreign ministry.


Libyan deputies pledge to end divisions

Updated 28 November 2020

Libyan deputies pledge to end divisions

  • At the end of talks, 123 of the parliament’s 180 members pledged to put an end to “hate speech” and “divisions”
  • They vowed to hold “parliamentary elections and to complete the transition as soon as possible”

TANGIER: More than 120 Libyan deputies pledged Saturday in Morocco to “end the divisions” that undermine their country, starting by convening the elected parliament as soon as they return home.
The House of Representatives has not met for two years, and Libya has been wracked by violence and chaos since the toppling and killing of dictator Muammar Qaddafi in 2011.
Two rival administrations have been vying for control of the country — the Government of National Accord and an eastern administration backed by part of the elected parliament.
The latter is deeply divided, with sessions taking place in parallel in the east and west.
At the end of five days of talks in Tangier, Morocco, 123 of the parliament’s 180 members pledged on Saturday to put an end to “hate speech” and “divisions” that undermine Libyan institutions.
They vowed to hold “parliamentary elections and to complete the transition as soon as possible,” and that all members of the House of Representatives would meet in session “as soon as they return” to Libya.
The session will take place in Ghadames, a desert oasis near Libya’s borders with both Algeria and Tunisia.
Ghadames is considered to be far from the centers of power.
“Having 123 deputies at the same table is in itself a success,” Moroccan Foreign Minister Nasser Bourita said.
“Libya needs a House of Representatives that plays its role... The next meeting in Libya will have a great impact on political dialogue,” he said.
The talks come at a time of increasing moves to break the deadlock in the country, which has Africa’s biggest oil reserves.
In mid-November, a UN-sponsored political dialogue forum in Tunis agreed to hold elections on December 24, 2021, but not on who will lead the transition.