Russia reports 8,164 new COVID-19 cases, 379 deaths

Russia reports 8,164 new COVID-19 cases, 379 deaths
The government coronavirus task force said 379 people had died in the past 24 hours. (File/AFP)
Updated 20 April 2021

Russia reports 8,164 new COVID-19 cases, 379 deaths

Russia reports 8,164 new COVID-19 cases, 379 deaths
  • The government coronavirus task force said 379 people had died in the past 24 hours

MOSCOW: Russia reported 8,164 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, including 1,996 in Moscow, taking the official national tally since the pandemic began to 4,718,854.
The government coronavirus task force said 379 people had died in the past 24 hours, pushing its total death toll to 106,307.
The federal statistics agency has kept a separate count and has reported a much higher toll of more than 225,000 from April 2020 to February.


New Delhi’s Sikh community opens oxygen station for COVID-19 patients

New Delhi’s Sikh community opens oxygen station for COVID-19 patients
Patients are seen at an 'oxygen langar' run by the Sikh community at Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha in Indrapuram, New Delhi. (AN photo)
Updated 3 min 42 sec ago

New Delhi’s Sikh community opens oxygen station for COVID-19 patients

New Delhi’s Sikh community opens oxygen station for COVID-19 patients
  • At least 700 people being cared for daily

NEW DELHI: New Delhi’s Sikh community has opened an oxygen station at its temple, saving thousands of lives, as hospitals in the capital continue to be overwhelmed by coronavirus patients.

Recent weeks have seen the city’s hospitals unable to help people due to a shortage of beds and oxygen supplies.

Since late April, India has been reporting the world’s highest daily tally of coronavirus cases.

It surpassed 414,000 new cases and 4,000 virus-related deaths on Friday. New Delhi is among the cities worst hit by the disease and has reported nearly 20,000 new cases and 400 COVID-19 deaths — many due to a shortage of hospital beds and oxygen supplies.

The oxygen station has been set up at Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha in the suburban town of Indirapuram. It is based on the concept of langars, or free community kitchens, where Sikhs serve meals to all those in need, regardless of their religion or caste.

The lifesaving initiative started in the third week of April, helping 40 people every day. It has since expanded with 100 volunteers now caring for at least 700 patients daily.

“It all started when my father, a businessman with good contacts with local industries, started getting calls for help and oxygen support when the COVID-19 cases started escalating in the second week of April,” Gurpreet Singh Rummy, president of the gurdwara committee and founding member of Khalsa Help, told Arab News on Friday. “Initially we supported some individuals but later decided to mobilize all our resources and set up an ‘oxygen langar’ to help.”

The langar has already helped 12,000 people, he said.

Ravindra Ahuja, a 62 year-old-resident from the Ghaziabad neighborhood, was brought to the langar on Thursday night when his oxygen levels plummeted to 80. His family tried to admit him to a hospital, but no beds were available.

“We came here in despair when we did not see any hope in any hospital,” Ahuja’s brother Ravi told Arab News. “The langar was sent by God and it is really helping people like us.”

But Ahuja’s condition started to deteriorate, even as his family’s struggle was being recounted.

Dr. Gaurav Srivastva, one of the langar’s volunteers, asked the family to immediately find a hospital with a ventilator as the gurdwara’s facility did not have the specialist equipment to help.

“The problem is that we cannot do anything here except giving oxygen. I feel 70 percent of his lungs are damaged,” the doctor told Arab News. “What is happening is that the patients who could have been saved with timely medical intervention are dying because of the lack of medical support. Some patients move around different hospitals of Delhi from morning to evening looking for a bed and finally come here. Imagine a patient who travels the whole day in a tuk-tuk looking for a hospital and finally comes here. How can we save such a person?”

Health authorities warned the coronavirus situation was worsening across the country and that India’s medical infrastructure was unable to cope.

“The situation is worrisome, and the cases are increasing day by day. We are trying to improve the situation,” Dr. Rajni Kant, spokesperson for the Indian Council of Medical Research, told Arab News. “The sudden surge in cases has taken us by surprise, creating more pressures on an already inadequate medical infrastructure.”

Dr. Adarsh Pratap Singh, from the All India Institute of Medical Science, described the situation as “very alarming.”

“Data about the death and infection (rates) are not the real figure actually. The figure is much higher than what is shown,” he said. “We might be heading toward an unimaginable crisis. What the government should now do is to create field hospitals on a war footing to take care of the patients.”


Prison ‘exacerbated’ risk London Bridge terrorist posed to public: Inquest

Usman Khan (L), 28, killed Saskia Jones, and Jack Merritt, in a knife attack in central London in 2019, just 11 months after he was released early from jail. (AP/Reuters/File Photos)
Usman Khan (L), 28, killed Saskia Jones, and Jack Merritt, in a knife attack in central London in 2019, just 11 months after he was released early from jail. (AP/Reuters/File Photos)
Updated 07 May 2021

Prison ‘exacerbated’ risk London Bridge terrorist posed to public: Inquest

Usman Khan (L), 28, killed Saskia Jones, and Jack Merritt, in a knife attack in central London in 2019, just 11 months after he was released early from jail. (AP/Reuters/File Photos)
  • Usman Khan, 28, killed 2 people in deadly knife attack in central London
  • 2019 attack among number of incidents that pushed UK to introduce stricter counter-terrorism measures in jails

LONDON: A psychologist warned that prison had made a terrorist more dangerous to the public than when he was first jailed, an inquest heard.

Usman Khan, 28, killed Saskia Jones, and Jack Merritt, in a knife attack in central London in 2019, just 11 months after he was released early from jail.

Khan had been imprisoned since 2010 for planning to bomb the London Stock Exchange and had associated with terrorists and radicalized other inmates while behind bars, the court investigating the deaths of Jones, 23, and Merritt, 25, was told.

Security officials believed Khan was a senior figure in an extremist gang while in jail. He had also been found in possession of terrorism and Daesh-related materials in his cell.

Ieva Cechaviciute, a psychologist who assessed Khan’s risk to the public while he was still in jail, said she had been “very worried” about his release.

The court was shown a report, produced by Cechaviciute, that warned seven months before his release that he continued to pose a threat to the public.

“Khan has made little progress while in prison, he doesn’t understand his own risk and being in prison has made him a greater risk than before by elevating his profile. He still refuses to accept responsibility for his crime,” minutes from a meeting said.

Imprisonment, Cechaviciute said, had “exacerbated” the risk that Khan posed, because of his violent and extremist behavior, as well as the “company he was keeping.”

“He didn’t have any convictions for violence, but he was becoming quite aggressive and there were assaults committed by him or him organizing them (inside jail). I saw that in addition to the offence he committed before, he could be violent himself,” she added.

Records showed that Khan had complied with deradicalization programs, and other staff have previously told the court that he appeared to have reformed while in jail and posed little threat to the public.

Cechaviciute and other psychologists had previously warned that his participation in these programs could have been “superficial.”

She told the court: “He was saying the right things, but it did not necessarily represent his behavior … it was quite clear to me that he has not disengaged with extremist ideology.

“It was strong in his head and the best we could hope for was him to desist from offending rather than disengaging from the ideology.”

Khan’s engagements with deradicalization programs, she added, were not “necessarily an indication of reduction in risk,” because he could be “trying to create a positive image of himself.”

Her report rated Khan as a medium risk for terrorist engagement, intent, and capability while inside prison — but predicted that it would rise to “high” when he was released.

Khan’s role in the deadly London Bridge terror attack caused controversy in the UK because of his recent release from prison after completing deradicalization programs.

Since the attack, the British government has introduced stricter counter-terrorism measures for known offenders.

The new Counterterrorism and Sentencing Act “completely ends the prospect of early release for anyone convicted of a serious terror offence” as well as significantly increases the amount of monitoring recently released terrorists are subjected to.

The inquest into the 2019 attack continues.


Greece to reopen beaches, museums after long lockdown

Greece to reopen beaches, museums after long lockdown
Updated 07 May 2021

Greece to reopen beaches, museums after long lockdown

Greece to reopen beaches, museums after long lockdown
  • Museums are to reopen on May 14, a day before Greece officially launches its travel season
  • Government began in early April to relax lockdown restrictions originally imposed in November

ATHENS: Greece will reopen private beaches on Saturday and museums next week, health officials said Friday as the tourism-dependent country gears up for a May 15 travel restart.
Museums are to reopen on May 14 — a day before Greece officially launches its travel season — followed by reduced-capacity outdoor cinemas on May 21 and theaters on May 28.
The government began in early April to relax lockdown restrictions originally imposed in November by reopening most retail shops except malls.
This was followed by high schools reopening a week later, and by outdoor restaurants and cafes on May 3.
However, tourism operators do not expect major travel arrivals before July.
Last month quarantine restrictions were lifted for vaccinated or tested travelers from the EU and a small number of other countries including Britain and the United States.
The third wave of the pandemic hit Greece hard with the majority of the country’s more than 10,000 virus deaths occurring over the last few months.
The country has recorded over 350,000 cases of coronavirus in a population of 10.8 million.
Over 3.4 million vaccinations have been carried out, and over a million people have received their second dose.


WHO gives emergency approval to Sinopharm, first Chinese COVID-19 vaccine

WHO gives emergency approval to Sinopharm, first Chinese COVID-19 vaccine
Updated 07 May 2021

WHO gives emergency approval to Sinopharm, first Chinese COVID-19 vaccine

WHO gives emergency approval to Sinopharm, first Chinese COVID-19 vaccine
  • Sinopharm becomes the first COVID-19 shot developed by a non-Western country to win the WHO's backing
  • First time WHO has given emergency use approval to any Chinese vaccine for any infectious disease

GENEVA: The World Health Organization (WHO) announced on Friday it had approved a COVID-19 vaccine from China’s state-owned drugmaker Sinopharm for emergency use.
The vaccine, one of two main Chinese shots that collectively have already been given to hundreds of millions of people in China and abroad, becomes the first COVID-19 shot developed by a non-Western country to win the WHO’s backing.
It is also the first time the WHO has given emergency use approval to any Chinese vaccine for any infectious disease.
A WHO emergency listing is a signal to national regulators on a product’s safety and efficacy, and would allow the shot to be included in COVAX, the global program to provide vaccines mainly for poor countries.
The WHO has previously given emergency approval to COVID-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer-BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, and, last week, Moderna.


UN must shoulder responsibility to resolve Israel-Palestine confict, Saudi envoy says

Abdallah Al-Mouallimi told Antonio Guterres that the Israel-Palestine issue was “central to the UN agenda since its inception.” (KSA Mission to UN/File Photo)
Abdallah Al-Mouallimi told Antonio Guterres that the Israel-Palestine issue was “central to the UN agenda since its inception.” (KSA Mission to UN/File Photo)
Updated 07 May 2021

UN must shoulder responsibility to resolve Israel-Palestine confict, Saudi envoy says

Abdallah Al-Mouallimi told Antonio Guterres that the Israel-Palestine issue was “central to the UN agenda since its inception.” (KSA Mission to UN/File Photo)
  • Abdallah Al-Mouallimi also pressed Guterres on plans for finding peaceful solutions to conflicts in Syria, Yemen and Libya

NEW YORK: It is time for the United Nations to shoulder responsibility in resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Saudi Arabia’s permanent representative to the UN said on Friday.

Abdallah Al-Mouallimi, speaking at the Secretary General selection dialogue, told Antonio Guterres that the issue was “central to the UN agenda since its inception,” and urged him to continue support and funding for United National Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA).

The Saudi envoy also pressed Guterres on plans for finding peaceful solutions to conflicts in Syria, Yemen and Libya.

“What are you planning to do so that peace in Middle East moves forward?” Al-Mouallimi asked the Secretary General.

He also asked Guterres, who is standing for reappointment as Secretary-General, how the UN planned to ensure the Middle East was an area free of nuclear weapons.

The Saudi envoy praised Guterres for achieving gender parity, but questioned him on geographical parity, pointing to the fact Arabs were underrepresented in senior leadership positions.

Al-Mouallimi also pressed the Secretary-General on plans to combat desertification and lack of water resources in Middle East.

More to follow…