The influence of Islamic art on Cartier’s high-end jewelry

The influence of Islamic art on Cartier’s high-end jewelry
Detail of cigarette case from 1930 including gold platinum and diamonds. (Supplied)
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Updated 05 August 2021

The influence of Islamic art on Cartier’s high-end jewelry

The influence of Islamic art on Cartier’s high-end jewelry
  • Paris exhibition shows how one of the world’s most glamorous brands drew inspiration from regional designs

PARIS: Having already explored its links with Japan and ancient Egypt, the French luxury goods brand Cartier is now exploring the profound influence that Islamic art has had on the company’s history.

To do so, Cartier turned to the Louvre — home to both the Museum of Decorative Arts and the Department of Islamic Arts. The former hosts the largest collection of jewelry in France, while the latter contains a priceless and historic collection of artworks from the Islamic world.

The result is “Cartier and Islamic Art: In Search of Modernity,” an exhibition that runs in Paris from October 21 to February 20, and will then travel to the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) in Texas.




17th Century Court Belt from Iran or India - silk with silver thread - from the Louvre. (Supplied)

Arab News spoke to Evelyne Possémé, chief curator of ancient and modern jewelry at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, and Judith Henon-Raynaud, curator and deputy director of the Department of Islamic Arts at the Louvre — two of the four curators of the exhibition. (The other two curators are Thomas W. Lentz, curator of Islamic and medieval art at the DMA, and Sarah Schleuning, the DMA’s interim chief curator and The Margot B. Perot senior curator of decorative arts and design.)

The exhibition, based on research that began in 2018 at the Louvre into Louis Cartier’s personal collection of Islamic art, consists of more than 500 pieces, including jewelry and other objects from Cartier, along with drawings, books, photos and archival documents tracing the brand’s interest in Islamic arts.

“The museum had acquired two Indian ivory pencil boxes from the early seventeenth century, which were part of this hitherto unknown collection,” Possémé told Arab News.




Cladding panel from Iran in late 14th - 15th century. (Supplied)

The exhibition is organized as a themed chronological tour divided into two parts, the first of which explores the origins of Cartier’s interest in Islamic art and architecture through the cultural backdrop of Paris at the beginning of the 20th century and reviews the creative context, as designers and studios searched for sources of inspiration. It includes pieces from Cartier’s library, Louis Cartier’s personal Islamic art collection, and Indian and Iranian jewelry.

The second part of the exhibition is dedicated to pieces inspired by Islamic art, from the start of the 20th century to the present day, and draws heavily on drawings, jewelry and objects from collections belonging to the Musée des Arts Décoratifs and the Musée du Louvre, which were part of the first exhibitions devoted to the arts of Islam.

The gallery exhibits some major pieces inspired by Islamic art and as well as animations detailing the composition of the jewels and their patterns.




Tiara, Cartier London, 1936. Platinum, diamonds, turquoise. (Supplied)

From the outset, visitors find themselves immersed in these shapes and motifs, with three of Cartier’s iconic creations set against masterpieces of Islamic art.

“The discovery of Islamic art at the beginning of the twentieth century had a significant impact on Cartier’s creators,” Henon-Raynaud explained. “Although famed for its garland-style jewelry, from 1904 onwards Cartier began developing pieces inspired by the geometric patterns of Islamic art found in books about ornamentation and architecture.”

The two curators cite enameled brick decorations originating from Central Asia and stepped merlons in the Art Deco style (a reference to the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris in 1925) as early influences on Cartier’s shift in its design philosophy.




Bib necklace 1947 - twisted 18- and 20-karat gold with diamonds and amethysts. (Supplied)

“This source of inspiration is perceptible throughout the twentieth century in the creations of the house,” explained Possémé. “They were sometimes easily identifiable, at other times broken down and redesigned to make their source untraceable.”

The House of Cartier, founded in 1847 by Louis-François Cartier, initially specialized in selling jewels and artworks. It was only when Louis-François’ son Alfred took over the management of the company in 1874 — supported by his eldest son Louis in 1898 — that the house began to design its own jewelry, while continuing its activity of reselling antique pieces.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Paris was a hub for trade in Islamic art. Thanks to major exhibitions organized at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris in 1903 and then in Munich in 1910, Louis Cartier discovered these new shapes that gradually permeated French society.




1924 head ornament - Cartier New York - Platinum - white and pink gold - diamonds and feathers. (Supplied)

Jacques Cartier, an enthusiastic traveler, visited India in 1911 to meet various Maharajas. The gemstone trade was in full swing by that time, and allowed Cartier to build a strong relationship with the Indian princes, so he collected many antique and contemporary jewelry items, which he would either resell unchanged, use as inspiration, or dismantle for incorporation into new designs.

“The influence of Islamic art is also clear in (Cartier’s) use of bold color ranges — lapis lazuli blue, emerald green and turquoise, for example — at a time when jewels tended to be created using diamonds in monochrome settings,” Henon-Raynaud said. “Finally, shapes and construction of jewelry from Persia and India gave rise to technical innovations such platinum mountings, in order to gain flexibility.”


British-Egyptian actor cast as Princess Diana’s beau Dodi Fayed in ‘The Crown’

Emmy-winning Netflix series “The Crown” has cast British-Egyptian actor Khalid Abdalla. (AFP)
Emmy-winning Netflix series “The Crown” has cast British-Egyptian actor Khalid Abdalla. (AFP)
Updated 25 September 2021

British-Egyptian actor cast as Princess Diana’s beau Dodi Fayed in ‘The Crown’

Emmy-winning Netflix series “The Crown” has cast British-Egyptian actor Khalid Abdalla. (AFP)

DUBAI: Emmy-winning Netflix series “The Crown” has cast British-Egyptian actor Khalid Abdalla to play Egyptian department store heir and film producer Dodi Al-Fayed, who had a brief relationship with the UK’s Princess Diana before their deaths in 1997.

Actor Salim Daw has been cast as Dodi’s father, billionaire and former Harrods owner Mohamed Al-Fayed.

Princess Diana became romantically involved with Dodi in the summer of 1997. Their brief union caused a paparazzi frenzy that ended when the pair died in a car crash just months after they started their relationship.

Australian actress Elizabeth Debicki will over the role  of Diana from Emma Corrin, who played a young version of the princess in Season 4.


Gigi Hadid, Dua Lipa hit the Versace runway in Milan

Gigi Hadid walked the runway at the Versace show in Milan this weekend. (Getty Images)
Gigi Hadid walked the runway at the Versace show in Milan this weekend. (Getty Images)
Updated 25 September 2021

Gigi Hadid, Dua Lipa hit the Versace runway in Milan

Gigi Hadid walked the runway at the Versace show in Milan this weekend. (Getty Images)

DUBAI/MILAN: Donatella Versace pumped energy into Milan Fashion week with a star-studded runway and guest list — with the likes of US-Palestinian model Gigi Hadid and British-Albanian pop superstar Dua Lipa hitting the catwalk in a number of sultry looks.

The collection was strong on the fashion house’s identifying markers: Bright colors, safety pins and lusciously silky foulards.

British singer and emerging fashion icon Dua Lipa opened the runway show in a skin-baring black suit held together with colored safety pins as her song “Physical” blasted through the venue and closed it in a liquidy fuchsia skirt and corset, The Associated Press reported.

Singer Dua Lipa opened the Versace show in an all-black look. (Getty Images)

In between, she was joined by Naomi Campbell, brightly clad in a hot-pink suit and orange shirt, Gigi Hadid in a snug latex black dress with just a silky flash of turquoise and pink, and Madonna’s daughter Lourdes Leon Ciccone, in a metallic silvery dress.

Black suits and dresses with tiny flashes of color in pins and foulards that peeked from hemlines and slits formed the beginning of the show. Toward the end, the colors grew ever more bold until they burst into a vivid palette of pink, aquamarine, seafoam green, acid green and yellow.

Gigi Hadid walked the runway at the Versace show in Milan this weekend. (Getty Images)

“The foulard is a fundamental component of Versace’s heritage and character,” Versace said in the show notes. “This season (it) turns everything on its head, it is no longer fluid or dreamy, the scarf is provocative, sexy, wound tight.”

Menswear was more relaxed, with floral suits, sportier varsity jackets with mesh tops, or bright leather jackets paired with tight T-shirts and jeans.

Front-row guests at the show included Milan’s own fashion influencer-turned-entrepreneur Chiara Ferragni and her husband, the singer Fedez, US influencer-turned-actress Addison Rae and actress Bella Thorne with her Italian beau, singer Benjamin Mascolo.

Meanwhile, Italian fashion house Prada returned to the live runway for the first time since February 2020, when the creative partnership between Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons was announced.

The collection was dotted with trains, corsets and evening gowns as Simons bemoaned the “irreality” of an evening gown “however beautiful,” as many gowns have spent the pandemic hanging in closets.

“These clothes can become complicated — evening dresses, historical costume. We want to make it uncomplicated, easy, that feels modern,” Simons said.


The Comedy Club in Jeddah is back in business 

The Comedy Club in Jeddah is back in business 
Updated 25 September 2021

The Comedy Club in Jeddah is back in business 

The Comedy Club in Jeddah is back in business 
  • For almost 500 days, the club was left empty because of government regulations to fight COVID-19

JEDDAH: After a prolonged interruption due to the ongoing coronavirus disease pandemic, The Comedy Club in Jeddah is back in business, and fans are flocking to it for some comic relief.
For almost 500 days, the club was left empty because of the pandemic and government regulations to fight COVID-19, preventing all live shows and mass gatherings that could put people at risk. But with restrictions easing, more people are aware of the rules and regulations and the decline in daily cases, and the club is back in full swing.
“The General Entertainment Authority reached out to us to return comedy shows, and we are one of the activities of the summer season festival in Jeddah,” Majed Al-Amoudi, comedian and content manager at The Comedy Club, told Arab News. “We perform live shows four days a week now: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.”
Al-Amoudi explained that because the shows are primarily theatrical, the pandemic significantly affected the ability to operate, and everything was put on indefinite hold. However, as with everything going digital nowadays, he said the club managed to provide entertaining content on its YouTube channel.

“The Comedy Club channel (has) a lot of programs like ‘Althalothiyat’ where we host famous people or influencers, but now, we are back to theater and going live.”
He said the club is planning for future events after the summer season is finished on Sept. 25. “We will return to our regular programing and we have major projects in the works with different parties, both in the government and private sectors, but can’t reveal at the moment.”
Mohammed Saleh, a 40-year-old private sector worker, said: “It feels good to be back in the theater. The comedians are brilliant and every month I would look forward to attending a show. 
“Watching shows on YouTube can only provide some relief; the live atmosphere is something else. The night is filled with laughter to almost tears, and that’s what you want in a comedy show, belly laughs and tears,” he added.

With plans for bigger and better shows in the works, Al-Amoudi highlighted that the club was sponsored by the GEA and received special attention from its governor, Turki Al-Sheikh, for three years, with the GEA the primary sponsor of the club during the Jeddah and Sharqiya seasons in 2019.
Founded in 2012, it was initially called the Jeddah Comedy Club. Located in Al-Shallal Theme Park, it hosts theatrical shows, stand-up comedy, improvisation, and musical nights. “We also perform theatricals and sketches, we write, edit, act it, and perform it all,” Al-Amoudi said.
He revealed that he is also on the hunt for female comics as part of the club’s future expansion. “We are always looking for female comedians, or even girls who want to be professional stand-up comedians, so that we can give them courses and prepare them for the entertainment world. We are talent hunting throughout the Kingdom for sure.
“Vision 2030 supports all arts in various fields and supports the development of the youth of the country. Of course, all our goals are in line with Vision 2030, and it is great supporter for us,” he added.


What We Are Reading Today: Along Came Google: A History of Library Digitization

What We Are Reading Today: Along Came Google: A History of Library Digitization
Updated 24 September 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Along Came Google: A History of Library Digitization

What We Are Reading Today: Along Came Google: A History of Library Digitization

Authors: Deanna Marcum and Roger C. Schonfeld

Libraries have long talked about providing comprehensive access to information for everyone. But when Google announced in 2004 that it planned to digitize books to make the world’s knowledge accessible to all, questions were raised about the roles and responsibilities of libraries, the rights of authors and publishers, and whether a powerful corporation should be the conveyor of such a fundamental public good. Along Came Google traces the history of Google’s book digitization project and its implications for us today.
Deanna Marcum and Roger Schonfeld draw on in-depth interviews with those who both embraced and resisted Google’s plans, from librarians and technologists to university leaders, tech executives, and the heads of leading publishing houses. They look at earlier digital initiatives to provide open access to knowledge,
and describe how Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page made the case for a universal digital library and drew on their company’s considerable financial resources to make it a reality.


Vatican Museums, Uffizi team up to confirm a Raphael is real

Vatican Museums, Uffizi team up to confirm a Raphael is real
Updated 24 September 2021

Vatican Museums, Uffizi team up to confirm a Raphael is real

Vatican Museums, Uffizi team up to confirm a Raphael is real
  • “Saints Peter and Paul by Raphael and Fra Bartlomeo. An homage to the Patrons of Rome,” marks the first exhibit for the Vatican Museums in over a year
  • The nearly life-sized paintings of Saints Peter and Paul are normally kept outside public view in the Papal Audience Apartment of the Apostolic Palace

VATICAN CITY: Two of the world’s most important art museums, the Vatican Museums and the Uffizi Galleries, joined forces for the first time on Friday.
The museums inaugurated a small exhibit of rarely seen works by two Renaissance masters that confirmed a painting long suspected of being by Raphael was indeed his work.
“Saints Peter and Paul by Raphael and Fra Bartlomeo. An homage to the Patrons of Rome,” marks the first exhibit for the Vatican Museums in over a year thanks to COVID-19 lockdowns that shuttered galleries precisely at the time that Italy was commemorating the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death with a series of shows.
The nearly life-sized paintings of Saints Peter and Paul are normally kept outside public view in the Papal Audience Apartment of the Apostolic Palace. But they have been restored and are being displayed for the first time alongside their preparatory sketches, usually held in Florence by the Uffizi Galleries, that the Florentine master Fra Bartolemeo made around 1513 after he was commissioned to paint the saints for a Rome church.
Fra Bartolomeo finished the painting of St. Paul, but because of an artistic crisis, never finished St. Peter. The restoration and research done in preparation for the exhibit confirmed that Raphael — long believed to have finished his friend’s commission — indeed completed the work, the Vatican Museums’ director, Barbara Jatta, told a press conference Friday alongside her Uffizi counterpart, Eike Schmidt.
“It’s not the moment for big shows ... but a small show allows us to enter more into the works themselves,” Jatta said.
While the Uffizi and Vatican Museums often exchange pieces for special exhibits, Schmidt and Jatta said this was the first time the two institutions had joined up to mount a show and catalogue together, with each museum restoring and offering new research into the pieces being exhibited and drawing on their respective patron groups to fund it.
“This is in a certain sense a novelty and its really beautiful to get out of the pandemic with this,” Schmidt said. Jatta added she foresaw future collaborative projects as well.
The exhibit, in a small gallery of the Vatican Museums’ picture gallery, is included in regular museum tickets, which because of COVID regulations must be reserved online in advance, while visitors to the museum must show a health pass to get in the door.