Music not haram, singing is: Quba Mosque imam

Sheikh Saleh Al-Maghamsi
Updated 29 May 2016

Music not haram, singing is: Quba Mosque imam

JEDDAH: The imam and preacher of the Quba Mosque in Madinah has said that music is not haram or forbidden.
Sheikh Saleh Al-Maghamsi clarified that he was referring to music, not singing, which he said is haram.
“The nation is in bad need of novelty and modernization, and I strongly believe in this, whether people accept my views or not,” he said during a talk show on MBC channel hosted by Yasser Amr and reported by local media.
Al-Maghamsi addressed a number of issues, including music, during the show. “I am not obliged to respond to any criticism on this issue. As for music, three Muslim scholars have said different things, although most of them agreed it is singing, not music, that is mentioned in the Holy Qur’an. Music is not talk, it is instruments, which is not specifically mentioned in the Holy Qur’an.”
He said that singing nowadays mostly involve men and women together, and this is forbidden. “I was asked about music in mobile phones and the main issue here is criminalizing people and making the issue of music as if it is our main or primary cause.”
On the issue of building mosques, Al-Maghamsi said: “There are other areas also that we need to focus on. Mosques are everywhere, thanks to Allah the Almighty ... every rich man builds a villa and a mosque in front of it.”
He added: “Building a mosque is good and recommended but building health facilities to treat poor patients and places for the displaced and other welfare services for the community are also important.”


Saudi anti-graft agency probes 105 corruption cases in different sectors

Updated 08 July 2020

Saudi anti-graft agency probes 105 corruption cases in different sectors

  • A Nazaha official said the Kingdom will continue to pursue cases of misappropriation of public money
  • The cases involved fraud, bribery, and financial and professional corruption

RIYADH: The Saudi Control and Anti-Corruption Authority (Nazaha) has initiated 105 corruption cases in the health, interior, power, and education sectors.
The cases involved fraud, bribery, and financial and professional corruption.
A Nazaha official said the Kingdom will continue to pursue cases of misappropriation of public money and harming state interests.
One of the cases involves the arrest of three employees working at the Saudi Electricity Co. for receiving a bribe amounting to €535,000 ($604,570) from a French company and opening bank accounts in another country (at the request of the company) for money laundering. Another case is the arrest of a university faculty member for asking for a bribe amounting to SR80,000 ($21,328) from a number of companies working on different projects at the university.
The authority also arrested a doctor at the Ministry of Health for violating the regulations at a quarantine facility.
A brigadier general was arrested for using his official vehicle to facilitate the passage of another private vehicle through security points during the curfew period.