Grand Mosque imam: Promote values through new media

Updated 22 February 2015

Grand Mosque imam: Promote values through new media

Imam and Khateeb at the Grand Mosque Sheikh Saleh Bin-Humaid called on the believers to employ the new media to promote virtue, humanitarian sentiments and values, love for others and encourage good and charitable deeds and cooperation in good deeds and piety.
''The new media has brought about various kinds of positive and negative social changes some of which are good, some bad, useful or harmful. It is a significant media platform that transcends geographical borders as people can come into contact from all corners of the world, cutting across distances of space and time. Its role is immense in the lives of individuals, families and nations and it has made giant strides in the world of communication,'' Bin-Humaid said while addressing the congregation at the Grand Mosque in Makkah on Friday.
The new media has the potential to open the doors of virtue making the path to righteousness easy, enabling a man to be obedient to Allah and engage in charitable deeds, he said.
It can also maintain the good relations between individuals, communities, relatives and friends and also between workers of the same profession and enable exchange of useful information and create a mutually loving and kind community doing virtuous deeds. It also can save time, efforts and money and communicate fast.
It is an effective means for teaching, learning and calling to Allah and offering guidance, and engage in good deeds and piety. It is also a new means to prevent evil and hostility from near and distant places,'' the imam said in his sermon.
The sheikh pointed out that officials can discover the faults in their official duties and administration, and look for better ways of performance.
On the other hand, the information networks, social media, chat rooms, blogs, personal accounts and Internet forums offer interactive relations between individuals or people at different places and positions without any time or moral restraint and so have the potential to waste one's precious time resulting in self-destruction, psychological disorders, frustration, upsetting personal relations and negligence in discharging one's responsibilities, the sheikh pointed out.
Bin-Humaid drew the attention of the believers to the perils that lurk in the new media such as spread of destructive ideologies, poor supervision and freedom from all checks and controls, no restriction in publishing permissive or pornographic contents that lead to moral degeneration, and waste of time and energy besides keeping people aloof from their families and communities, and become addicts to permissive sites.
He added that the new media also provides the platform to spread gossips, falsehoods and material for character assassination without revealing the identity of the villains. They can also be used for promoting hatred, sectarianism, enmity and disintegration of societies
In his seron at the Prophet's Mosque in Madinah, Imam and Khateeb Sheikh Abdul Bari Al-Thobaiti called on the believers to struggle to win the love and satisfaction of the Almighty. He stressed the need for dedicated and sincere efforts to serve one's parents and the society at large.


Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

Updated 06 June 2020

Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

MADINAH: Hundreds of thousands of worshippers attended the first Friday prayers to be held at the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah since the gatherings were suspended to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The green light for the resumption of the prayer meetings came as part of a plan to gradually reopen the Kingdom’s mosques while ensuring worshippers and visitors adhered to preventive measures.

A ban on access to the Rawdah remained in place and only groups of worshippers numbering up to a maximum of 40 percent of the mosque’s capacity were being allowed entry.

Precautionary measures also included the allocation of specific doors for the entry of worshippers, the installation of thermal cameras, removal of all carpets so that prayers could be performed on the marble, sanitization of the mosque’s floors and courtyards, periodic opening of domes and canopies to ventilate the mosque, and the removal of Zamzam water containers.

The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah will be closed after evening prayers and reopened one hour before dawn prayers. Parking lots will operate at 50 percent capacity and a media awareness campaign has been launched to highlight safety procedures at the holy site.

Medical teams have also been stationed at the main entrances to the mosque in cooperation with the Ministry of Health.

Elsewhere in the Kingdom, worshippers also flocked to perform Friday prayers at mosques amid strict health measures.

On May 31, Saudi authorities reopened all mosques for prayers, except in Makkah, as part of the Kingdom’s plan for a gradual return to normal life.

Last week the minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance said that the country’s mosques were ready to welcome back worshippers, following his field trips to check that necessary preparations had been made.

All worshippers must still maintain a distance of 2 meters between rows, wear masks to enter a mosque, and Friday sermons and prayers have been limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.