Lara Atallah: Moments of Emotion

Updated 14 June 2012
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Lara Atallah: Moments of Emotion

Ayyam Gallery in Beirut is showing until June 20 the ‘Abandoned School Series’ by the exceptionally talented Lebanese photographer, Lara Atallah, which won second place at the 2011 Shabab Ayyam Photography Competition in Dubai.
Ayyam Gallery with its outlets in Syria, Lebanon and the United Arab Emirates, is one of the most prominent galleries in the Middle East representing some of today’s emerging and established Arab artists.
Speaking about the exhibition entitled, “If Walls could Talk”, Atallah says that her aim is to tackle the issue, “the photography is a means not an end”. And that is precisely why “photography is a fine art, a medium of expression which permits one person to convey to another an abstract idea of a lofty emotion”.
Photographs can indeed represent abstract ideas despite the fact that the camera only captures the concrete reality. By choosing how to reveal or hide parts of a subject, Atallah expresses her thoughts. Through this subtractive process of selection, a photographer creates an atmosphere by choosing exactly how subjects are placed and how they interact with each other.
Atallah was born in Beirut in 1989 and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from the American University in Beirut. Since her graduation, her work has reflected her concern for social issues. She has been using different media from podcasts to writing and photography. She has lately expanded her work with a series of photographs recording everything from street vendors to construction sites, with the aim to capture the complex layers of Beirut life.
“If Walls Could Talk” features a series of 12 photographs taken within an abandoned public school on Bliss Street in Beirut. These pictures far from creating a sense of emptiness, loneliness and neglect bring to mind the happy memories of the school brimming with life. The walls, a blackboard with words still written on it, discarded desks and chairs, the majestic wooden staircase, all tell the stories, they have witnessed without the need for words.
These visual compositions not only record the past but they also help us understand more about ourselves and our life in this world. Atallah focuses on two social problems: Gentrification and modernization.
Gentrification refers to that silent, unobtrusive pressure which surreptitiously alters a landscape and its social history and pushes families out of their homes. When Atallah photographs the stunning wooden staircase with its intricate iron wrought work, she not only shows the loss of the city’s architectural heritage but also the loss of basic necessities such as a public school.
Modernization erases the soul of a place and this exhibition “If Walls Could Talk” highlights the social and economical costs of demolishing old schools, old shops and old houses.
This awesome series of photographs has been meticulously composed. Atallah has judiciously used color, the playful contrast of light and shade, as well as lines and shape, depth and unity, to create a stunning work of art.  
Here is a strong young artist who has something to say. Her photographs are not only aesthetically pleasing but they also tell a story.

— For more information, visit: www.ayyamgallery.com
 


Young violinist hits a winning note in Riyadh

Updated 23 July 2018
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Young violinist hits a winning note in Riyadh

  • Chloe Chua of Singapore is considered the world's foremost youngest pianist
  • Since the opening of its doors to global talent, people in Saudi Arabia have been enjoying electrifying performances of various world-class musicians and singers.

RIYADH: The cultural landscape of Saudi Arabia is changing at a rapid pace and it is fast becoming a hub of cultural activities. 
Since the opening of its doors to global talent, people in Saudi Arabia have been enjoying electrifying performances of various world-class musicians and singers.
The Saudi authorities are leaving no stone unturned to promote local talent and to make the Kingdom part of the global cultural revolution. 
On Saturday, the General Cultural Authority organized yet another unforgettable concert at the King Fahad Cultural Center, which saw the world’s youngest violinist, Chloe Chua from Singapore perform to a spellbound audience. The 11-year-old talented violinist has been a student at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts School of Young Talents (SYT) strings section since the age of four. 
She is studying with Yin Ke, string program leader of SYT and recently won the first prize in the Menuhin Competition Geneva 2018. She has been awarded prizes in numerous other competitions, coming first in the 24th Andrea Postacchini International Violin Competition (May 2017) and third in violin group A of the 2nd Zhuhai International Mozart Competition for Young Musicians. 
Chua was accompanied by the internationally distinguished pianist, Gordon Back. Back is an official accompanist at major international violin competitions such as the Queen Elizabeth competition, the Carl Flesch Competition (London), the International Tchaikovsky Competition (Moscow), the International Violin Competition of Indianapolis (US), and the Menuhin Competition (UK).

VIEW OUR PHOTO ALBUM: Chloe Chua's Concert in Riyadh

The pieces of music, which included Beethoven, Mozart and Johan Svendsen, were inspired by different stories and different musical rhythms and drew rapturous applause.
The program began with a 15-minute performance by Eman Gusti, a 20-year-old Saudi pianist who started playing at the age of nine. 
“No one on earth can imagine how I felt when I heard the audience applauded. It is such a great honor,” Gusti told Arab News.
She said she finally felt she had a place to express her passion and an umbrella (the General Culture Authority) to belong to. “Saudi women have a great space to express their enthusiasm in interactive situations and places. I am very happy to be part of this golden era.” 
After her segment, the main performance started with Chua and Back. “I am very happy to perform in Saudi Arabia,” Chua said afterward. “I chose these seven pieces because they are very good in terms of the music, rhythm and themes. I wanted to show that classical music can be a joy to everyone. I chose music because it makes everybody happy, and I can travel around the world to make the world happy.” 
Now Chua and Back are set to perform in Jeddah today. “I am very excited about seeing Jeddah and playing music in front of an audience there,” she said. 
It was the first time Back had played in Saudi Arabia. “It is a very wonderful experience,” he told Arab News.
When asked whether music can bring people from different countries and diverse cultures together, he said: “I think it can, because with music you do not need any language. It transcends languages. It can also unify people. 
“Hopefully I will come back to perform again here in Saudi Arabia,” he said.