Conditional recruitment for female expat teachers OK’d

Updated 30 October 2014
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Conditional recruitment for female expat teachers OK’d

Ending days of speculation on the matter, the Labor Ministry on Tuesday announced that expatriate women teachers on dependent visas can work at private schools without transferring their sponsorship.
In an exclusive statement to Arab News, Ahmed Al-Humaidan, undersecretary for labor policies at the ministry, said: “The decision is aimed at offsetting the shortage of teachers at private schools with a view to utilizing locally available expertise rather than bringing in new teachers from abroad.”
However, teachers would have to apply for posts through the Labor Ministry’s Ajeer system and get formal approval from the Education Ministry to ensure they have the required qualifications and experience. The system does not accept applications not approved by the Education Ministry, Al-Humaidan stated.
Moreover, the applicant would have to undergo tests by the Education Ministry similar to those for resident teachers. Preference would be given to Saudis. If Saudis are not available, then women expatriate teachers would be employed, he said.
The announcement comes after conflicting comments by labor ministry officials over the past few days. Initial reports, quoting unnamed labor ministry sources, had claimed that expatriate women teachers would be able to work without transferring their sponsorship. This was followed by an official in Jeddah on Monday saying that a proposal on the matter is being considered, but not approved.
The initial media reports had resulted in many teachers expressing happiness that they would be allowed to work while remaining under the sponsorship of their husbands, fathers or brothers.
Arab News had received hundreds of calls and queries from teachers asking to verify the reports.


Houthis accused of looting humanitarian aid

A worker unloads aid packages from a Saudi air force cargo plane, at an airfield in the northern province of Marib, Yemen, in this January 22, 2018 photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 23 July 2018
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Houthis accused of looting humanitarian aid

  • The Yemen Scholars Association condemned the Houthi militia for looting relief aid in areas under its control

JEDDAH: The Yemen Scholars Association on Saturday blamed the Iranian-backed Houthi militias for the deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Yemen.
The associated accused the Houthis of looting humanitarian aid.
According to the Yemeni scholars, Houthi actions have resulted in the suspension of salaries of hundreds of thousands of employees for nearly two years.
The Association praised the efforts and humanitarian support of King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), which provides, directly and indirectly, most of the humanitarian relief support for the Yemeni people.
The Yemen Scholars Association condemned the Houthi militia for looting relief aid in areas under its control.
According to a human rights report, At least 113 people have been tortured to death in detention centers in Yemen run by the Houthis since the coup began
Yemeni Human Rights Minister Mohammed Askar told Arab News that the figures in the report were only estimates and that the real figures were much higher.