King empowers next generation

Updated 01 May 2015
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King empowers next generation

The Cabinet reshuffle announced by Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman on Wednesday has now started the process of passing the reins of the country’s government to the next generation, particularly the grandsons of the Kingdom’s founder. 
King Salman relieved Crown Prince Muqrin, deputy premier, of his position, at his request, and replaced him with Prince Mohammed bin Naif, who will retain the Interior Ministry portfolio and the chairmanship of the Council of Political and Security Affairs. This makes him the first grandson of the late King Abdulaziz to be named crown prince.
The royal decree also named another grandson, Prince Mohammed bin Salman, as the deputy crown prince and second deputy premier. He will retain the Defense Ministry portfolio and chairmanship of the Council of Economic and Development Affairs. 
In the royal decree, King Salman said that he had received a letter from Prince Muqrin outlining his desire to relinquish his position as crown prince. Praising Prince Muqrin, the king said he had agreed to the request.
The king said the appointment of the deputy crown prince was taken in terms of the procedures established by the late King Abdullah, which prioritizes the state’s interests “above all other considerations.” 
He said Prince Mohammed bin Salman has shown everyone through his work that he has “great” abilities.
The decree stated that Prince Mohammed bin Salman has been able to perform his duties in an “optimal manner” and in accordance with Islamic law on transition of power. After taking charge on Wednesday, the new deputy crown prince met with the President of Eritrea Isaias Afwerki and had discussions on the two countries’ bilateral relations. 
The Kingdom also appointed a new foreign minister after almost 40 years. Approving the request from Prince Saud Al-Faisal, the longest-serving foreign minister in the world, King Salman relieved him of his responsibilities on health grounds, and appointed Adel Al-Jubeir, the Saudi ambassador to the United States, as the new minister.
However, Prince Saud will continue as a minister of state, Cabinet member, adviser and special envoy to the king, and supervisor of foreign affairs. The new Cabinet will also have a fulltime Health Minister Khalid Al-Falih, the head of Saudi Aramco. In addition, Mohammed Al-Jasser, minister of economy and planning, has been relieved of his position and appointed an adviser at the royal court at the rank of a minister.
Labor Minister Adel Fakeih has been appointed as the new minister of economy and planning to replace Al-Jasser, while Mufrej Al-Haqbani is now the new minister of labor. In addition, Khalid Al-Essa, deputy chief of the royal court, has been relieved of his post and appointed as minister of state and a member of the Council of Political and Security Affairs.
Abdulrahman Al-Hazza, president of the Radio and Television Commission, has been relieved of his post and replaced by Abdullah bin Saleh Al-Jasser, who will retain his position as deputy minister of culture and information. 
Other important appointments include Sheikh Khalid Al-Yousef as chairman of the Board of Grievances at the rank of a minister, and Hamad Al-Suwailem as chief of the royal court at the rank of a minister.
Nasser Al-Shahrani has been appointed as deputy president of the Human Rights Commission; Amro bin Ibrahim Rajab as deputy chief of the Cabinet’s Bureau of Experts; and Mansour Al-Mansour as assistant general president of Youth Welfare.
Also, Saleh Al-Jasser has been appointed as adviser at the royal court. The king relieved other officials of their posts including Norah bint Abdullah Al-Fayez, deputy minister of education for girls, Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Sheikh, deputy minister of education for boys, Mansour Al-Hawasi, deputy minister of health for health affairs and Mohammed Khashim, deputy minister of health for planning and development.
The king also announced that all military and security personnel in “appreciation of their extraordinary services” would be getting a one-month salary bonus.
 
THE NEW CABINET 
 
* Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques 
King Salman, prime minister
 
* Crown Prince Mohammed bin Naif, 
deputy premier and minister of interior 
 
* Prince Saud Al-Faisal, state minister, king’s special envoy and adviser and supervisor of foreign affairs
 
* Prince Mansour bin Miteb, 
minister of state
 
* Prince Miteb bin Abdullah, 
National Guard minister
 
* Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, defense minister
 
* Saleh Al-Asheikh, 
Islamic affairs minister
 
* Azzam Al-Dakhil, 
education minister
 
* Walid Al-Samaani, 
justice minister
 
* Matlab Al-Nafeesa, 
minister of state
 
* Musaed Al-Aiban, 
minister of state
 
* Ali Al-Naimi, 
minister of petroleum and mineral resources
 
* Ibrahim Al-Assaf, 
finance minister
 
* Abdullah Al-Hussayen, 
water and electricity minister
 
* Adel Fakeih, 
minister of economy and planning
 
* Essam bin Saeed, 
housing minister
 
* Bandar Hajjar, 
Haj minister
 
* Tawfiq Al-Rabiah, 
commerce and industry minister
 
* Mohammed Abusaq, 
minister of state for Shoura affairs
 
* Abdullah Al-Muqbil, 
minister of transport
 
* Mohammed Al-Suwaiyel, 
telecommunication and IT minister 
 
* Majed Al-Qassabi, 
social affairs minister
 
* Saad Al-Jabri, 
minister of state
 
* Mufrej Al-Haqabani, 
labor minister
 
* Mohammed Abdul Malik Al-Asheikh, 
minister of state
 
* Abdul Lateef Al-Asheikh, 
municipal and rural affairs minister 
 
* Khalid Al-Falih, 
health minister
 
* Adel Al-Jubeir, 
foreign minister
 
* Khaled Al-Araj, 
minister of civil service
 
* Adel Al-Toraifi, 
culture and information minister
 
* Abdul Rahman Al-Fadli, 
agriculture minister
 
* Khaled Al-Eissa, 
state minister


Saudi Arabia witnesses unprecedented achievements one year after MBS became crown prince

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has become the government’s face of reform, modernization and change. (SPA)
Updated 22 June 2018
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Saudi Arabia witnesses unprecedented achievements one year after MBS became crown prince

  • Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is the architect of a wide-ranging plan for social and economic reforms known as Saudi Vision 2030
  • Vision 2030 seeks to make Saudi Arabia non-oil based economy and the large developments at the Red Sea, Qiddiya and, NEOM, are part of the efforts to lure in investors and promote tourism sector.

JEDDAH: June 21 marked one year of Mohammed bin Salman as crown prince of Saudi Arabia.Since assuming the role, the crown prince, fondly known as MBS, has been working for the socioeconomic transformation of the Kingdom.
He is the architect of a wide-ranging plan for social and economic reforms known as Saudi Vision 2030, which aims to diversify the economy of the Kingdom and reduce its dependence on oil income.
Among the reforms envisaged in the Vision 2030 plan are the reopening of cinemas and allowing both sexes to attend concerts.
Another major development is the lifting of a ban on women driving. From June 24, women in Saudi Arabia will be able to take the wheel. The crown prince’s Vision 2030 reform plan seeks to elevate women to nearly one-third of the workforce, up from the current 22 percent.
In a statement issued to the Saudi Press Agency (SPA), Dr. Yousef bin Ahmed Al-Othaimeen, secretary-general of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, said that as the architect of Saudi Vision 2030, the crown prince was inspiring the country’s youth and introducing structural changes to the Saudi economy and society.
Al-Othaimeen said that in one year he had taken many important initiatives at the national and international level and reinforced Saudi Arabia’s leading role in defending and supporting issues related to the wider Muslim world.
In this area, the OIC chief said, the most notable achievement was the creation of the Islamic Military Counter Terrorism Coalition.
Vision 2030 seeks to boost the Saudi non-oil based economy, and the large developments at the Red Sea, Qiddiya and NEOM, the futuristic mega city, are part of efforts to attract investors and promote the Kingdom’s tourism sector.
Saudi Minister of Telecommunications and IT Abdullah bin Amer Al-Sawaha said that the Kingdom is geared up to achieve the goals of socioeconomic transformation as envisaged in Vision 2030. He said that during the last year Saudi Arabia had achieved great success in this ambition.
Civil Services Minister Sulaiman bin Abdullah Al-Hamdan said that last year was characterized by many achievements. The Kingdom, he said, witnessed the continuation of the successful implementation of the crown prince’s Vision 2030, which covers all aspects of life.
Saudi Education Minister Dr. Ahmed bin Mohammed Al-Issa said: “Our country is looking forward to a bright future in line with an ambitious vision. It is standing at the threshold of great transformation.”
Saudi Arabia has also witnessed several unprecedented developments since Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman began implementing his reform plans. In a bid to ensure transparency in the financial system to promote international investments, the Kingdom launched a drive to root out corruption from society without discrimination.
Saudi Justice Minister Dr. Waleed bin Mohammed Al-Samaani, who is also president of the Supreme Judicial Council, said that the crown prince is a leader whose impact has surpassed local and regional levels. He has emerged as one of the most influential figures at the global level, he said.
Islamic Affairs Minister Dr. Abdulatif bin Abdul Aziz Al-Ashiekh said: “The Kingdom’s Vision 2030 is a comprehensive national development program that seeks to achieve prosperity for the country. The crown prince has worked very hard to achieve many goals in record time.
“The Ministry of Islamic Affairs has received a great deal of support and attention from the crown prince to help fight extremist and deviant ideologies.”
The minister said that these efforts come within the framework of Vision 2030 to eradicate all sources of corruption.
MBS’s history of philanthropic initiatives has earned him many awards. In 2011, he established the Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation (Misk), which enables young Saudis to learn, develop and progress in the fields of business, literature, culture, science and technology, and sociology.
“The crown prince’s initiatives in relief and humanitarian work have been admired and praised by the UN and its related organizations,” said Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Centre (KSRelief) and an adviser to the royal court.
Al-Rabeeah said that the crown prince had allocated $66.7 million to fight the cholera epidemic in Yemen, in addition to his efforts to help the needy throughout the world without discrimination.
He said that the crown prince had worked hard to build a new phase of progress and prosperity for the country with the help of the youth who are the core of the Kingdom’s future.
In recent years, the crown prince has become the government’s face of reform, modernization and change. In a country where about 60 percent of the population is under 30, the young crown prince is widely seen as an icon in the push toward socioeconomic reforms.
The crown prince also heads the Council of Economic and Development Affairs, which aims to establish a seamless mechanism to achieve Vision 2030 goals.