King empowers next generation

Updated 01 May 2015
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King empowers next generation

The Cabinet reshuffle announced by Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman on Wednesday has now started the process of passing the reins of the country’s government to the next generation, particularly the grandsons of the Kingdom’s founder. 
King Salman relieved Crown Prince Muqrin, deputy premier, of his position, at his request, and replaced him with Prince Mohammed bin Naif, who will retain the Interior Ministry portfolio and the chairmanship of the Council of Political and Security Affairs. This makes him the first grandson of the late King Abdulaziz to be named crown prince.
The royal decree also named another grandson, Prince Mohammed bin Salman, as the deputy crown prince and second deputy premier. He will retain the Defense Ministry portfolio and chairmanship of the Council of Economic and Development Affairs. 
In the royal decree, King Salman said that he had received a letter from Prince Muqrin outlining his desire to relinquish his position as crown prince. Praising Prince Muqrin, the king said he had agreed to the request.
The king said the appointment of the deputy crown prince was taken in terms of the procedures established by the late King Abdullah, which prioritizes the state’s interests “above all other considerations.” 
He said Prince Mohammed bin Salman has shown everyone through his work that he has “great” abilities.
The decree stated that Prince Mohammed bin Salman has been able to perform his duties in an “optimal manner” and in accordance with Islamic law on transition of power. After taking charge on Wednesday, the new deputy crown prince met with the President of Eritrea Isaias Afwerki and had discussions on the two countries’ bilateral relations. 
The Kingdom also appointed a new foreign minister after almost 40 years. Approving the request from Prince Saud Al-Faisal, the longest-serving foreign minister in the world, King Salman relieved him of his responsibilities on health grounds, and appointed Adel Al-Jubeir, the Saudi ambassador to the United States, as the new minister.
However, Prince Saud will continue as a minister of state, Cabinet member, adviser and special envoy to the king, and supervisor of foreign affairs. The new Cabinet will also have a fulltime Health Minister Khalid Al-Falih, the head of Saudi Aramco. In addition, Mohammed Al-Jasser, minister of economy and planning, has been relieved of his position and appointed an adviser at the royal court at the rank of a minister.
Labor Minister Adel Fakeih has been appointed as the new minister of economy and planning to replace Al-Jasser, while Mufrej Al-Haqbani is now the new minister of labor. In addition, Khalid Al-Essa, deputy chief of the royal court, has been relieved of his post and appointed as minister of state and a member of the Council of Political and Security Affairs.
Abdulrahman Al-Hazza, president of the Radio and Television Commission, has been relieved of his post and replaced by Abdullah bin Saleh Al-Jasser, who will retain his position as deputy minister of culture and information. 
Other important appointments include Sheikh Khalid Al-Yousef as chairman of the Board of Grievances at the rank of a minister, and Hamad Al-Suwailem as chief of the royal court at the rank of a minister.
Nasser Al-Shahrani has been appointed as deputy president of the Human Rights Commission; Amro bin Ibrahim Rajab as deputy chief of the Cabinet’s Bureau of Experts; and Mansour Al-Mansour as assistant general president of Youth Welfare.
Also, Saleh Al-Jasser has been appointed as adviser at the royal court. The king relieved other officials of their posts including Norah bint Abdullah Al-Fayez, deputy minister of education for girls, Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Sheikh, deputy minister of education for boys, Mansour Al-Hawasi, deputy minister of health for health affairs and Mohammed Khashim, deputy minister of health for planning and development.
The king also announced that all military and security personnel in “appreciation of their extraordinary services” would be getting a one-month salary bonus.
 
THE NEW CABINET 
 
* Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques 
King Salman, prime minister
 
* Crown Prince Mohammed bin Naif, 
deputy premier and minister of interior 
 
* Prince Saud Al-Faisal, state minister, king’s special envoy and adviser and supervisor of foreign affairs
 
* Prince Mansour bin Miteb, 
minister of state
 
* Prince Miteb bin Abdullah, 
National Guard minister
 
* Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, defense minister
 
* Saleh Al-Asheikh, 
Islamic affairs minister
 
* Azzam Al-Dakhil, 
education minister
 
* Walid Al-Samaani, 
justice minister
 
* Matlab Al-Nafeesa, 
minister of state
 
* Musaed Al-Aiban, 
minister of state
 
* Ali Al-Naimi, 
minister of petroleum and mineral resources
 
* Ibrahim Al-Assaf, 
finance minister
 
* Abdullah Al-Hussayen, 
water and electricity minister
 
* Adel Fakeih, 
minister of economy and planning
 
* Essam bin Saeed, 
housing minister
 
* Bandar Hajjar, 
Haj minister
 
* Tawfiq Al-Rabiah, 
commerce and industry minister
 
* Mohammed Abusaq, 
minister of state for Shoura affairs
 
* Abdullah Al-Muqbil, 
minister of transport
 
* Mohammed Al-Suwaiyel, 
telecommunication and IT minister 
 
* Majed Al-Qassabi, 
social affairs minister
 
* Saad Al-Jabri, 
minister of state
 
* Mufrej Al-Haqabani, 
labor minister
 
* Mohammed Abdul Malik Al-Asheikh, 
minister of state
 
* Abdul Lateef Al-Asheikh, 
municipal and rural affairs minister 
 
* Khalid Al-Falih, 
health minister
 
* Adel Al-Jubeir, 
foreign minister
 
* Khaled Al-Araj, 
minister of civil service
 
* Adel Al-Toraifi, 
culture and information minister
 
* Abdul Rahman Al-Fadli, 
agriculture minister
 
* Khaled Al-Eissa, 
state minister


Expert calls for self-examination for early detection of breast cancer

One in every eight women will suffer from breast cancer in her lifetime. (Shutterstock)
Updated 11 min 44 sec ago
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Expert calls for self-examination for early detection of breast cancer

  • Women in Saudi Arabia have become more aware of the disease and receive support from their families

JEDDAH: In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Amel Merdad is providing a helpful guide about the disease to women .
Recent statistics from the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that more than 1.2 million breast cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. Breast cancer kills more than 500,000 women a year. The disease ranks second in cancer incidence, after lung cancer, worldwide.
One in every eight women will breast cancer in her lifetime.
The evolution of scientific research and increased awareness have contributed significantly to the increase in recovery rates, as a result of early detection of the disease.
Ten percent of breast cancer cases occur as a result of genetic mutations inherited by the generations in a family.
The incidence of breast cancer increases with age, and it usually occurs after age 40. The average age of breast cancer patients in Saudi Arabia is 48 years and it is so worldwide. Dr. Merdad provided her advice on early screening methods. “Periodic self-breast examination helps women to be aware and familiar with their breasts so they can take care of them, being healthy and not only pretty.
Dr. Merdad added that self-breast examination is to be done once a month on the sixth or seventh day of the menstrual cycle from the age of 20 and forward. “In the case of menopause, self-examination takes place on the same date every month,” she said.
She also gave these useful guidelines:

Self testing
Stand in front of the mirror and look at the breasts to check for anything unusual, such as the presence of lumps or differences in the size of the breasts or the presence of swelling or changes in skin or nipple.
Put your hands behind your head to notice in the mirror for any difference in the lower part of your breasts. Put your hands on your waist and bend forward slightly with the pressure of the shoulders and elbows forward to check for any change in the shape or size of the breasts.
Lift your left hand and use three fingers from the right hand to examine the left breast in a circular way from the outer edge of the breast and in the direction of the nipple, focusing on the area between the breast and armpit and area under the armpit.
Repeat this step with your right breast. Press the nipple gently to observe any abnormal discharge. Repeat the previous steps while lying on your back.

Screening
Age 20-40 years old: Self-examination is recommended monthly. Also check with your doctor every three years. An ultrasound is recommended for the breast examination only if necessary.
Age 40-65 years: Self-examination is recommended monthly and check with the doctor every year. Mammograms are indicated once every one to two years for all women.
More than 65 years: Monthly self-examination and check with your doctor annually. Schedule a mammogram every two to five years.
Dr. Merdad said that taking care of a woman psychologically plays an important role in enhancing the cure rate.
“To all women. Protect your health, have a great life, and screen yourselves for breast cancer,” she added.