12 hours maximum work period for private sector

Updated 24 September 2015
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12 hours maximum work period for private sector

RIYADH: The Ministry of Labor announced that amendments that have been recently adopted will enter force starting Oct. 8.
The amendments emphasize the prohibition of keeping the worker more than 12 working hours in the workplace, and on giving him a break of 30 minutes every five hours to pray, eat and rest.
The amendments also oblige each employer who employs more than 50 workers to give training courses to at least 12 percent of the workforce, and this training ratio will be included in the Saudization ratio for Saudi workers who complete their studies abroad.
The ministry said that any worker who works on a daily basis should collect his wages once a week; those who work as freelancers for at least two weeks should get part of their wages at the beginning of the work week and the remaining money when the work is completed.
According to the amendments, the worker has the right of five days leave in the case of the death of his wife or one of his ascendants, descendants or upon marriage with full pay, and three days in case of the death of a baby.
The employer in these cases may request documentation of such events.
Workers, according to the amendments, cannot be moved from the workplace without prior written consent from the worker himself if such move requires a change of residence.
The ministry has the powers, if the employer contravenes the Saudization criteria, to refrain from renewing his license.


Major projects, investments worth over $685bn unveiled on Saudi National Day

A photo taken on July 5, 2018, shows Bader al-Ajmi, 38,(L) owner of "One Way Burger" serving customers from his truck at a main street in the capital Riyadh. (AFP)
Updated 22 September 2018
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Major projects, investments worth over $685bn unveiled on Saudi National Day

  • The private sector’s contribution to the GDP at constant prices doubled to around SR1236.6 million in 2017

JEDDAH: A major economic boost in the form of 10 major projects and investments exceeding SR685 billion ($183 billion) were unveiled as celebrations of the 88th Saudi National Day got under way.
The Council of Saudi Chambers released a report focusing on great economic achievements in 2017.
These projects reflect the Kingdom’s vision under the wise leadership of King Salman and that of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to provide a brighter future through diversifying sources of national income, tackling environmental challenges and increasing investment and prosperity.
The report summarized the most important events and economic developments in the Kingdom over the past year. These include the lifting of the ban on women driving in June, and the establishment of the General Authority for Cyber Security, in addition to the numerous royal decrees providing financial support to Saudis.
It also noted the important decisions related to the Saudi business sector. These include the launch of a private sector incentive program with a value of SR72 billion, the privatization of 10 government sectors and the establishment of the General Authority for Real Estate. The private sector is still showing a strong performance as an efficient partner in the inclusive development process and in the achievement of the Kingdom’s 2030 Vision, the report noted, as it contributes 39 percent to the Saudi gross domestic product (GDP).
The private sector’s contribution to the GDP at constant prices doubled to around SR1236.6 million in 2017. There has been increased contribution to GDP from non-oil private sector streams.
The private sector also witnessed an increase in the number of workers, in its capital, in the number of shares on the Saudi market, in the cumulative number of establishments operating in the Kingdom, and in non-oil exports.
Continued growth of the private sector was attributed by the report to the Saudi government’s support. This support comes through initiatives such as the removal of obstacles to financial development, improvements to the working environment and policies adopted to boost investment.
It also reviewed the private sector’s efforts to support diversification of the economy and lower unemployment rates.
The importance of the measures taken to prioritize the employment of qualified Saudi workers over the employment of expatriates in the private sector were stressed, as well as the sector’s role in providing education and health services.