Crown Prince orders high-level probe into stampede

Updated 25 September 2015
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Crown Prince orders high-level probe into stampede

MINA: Crown Prince Mohammed bin Naif, deputy premier and minister of interior, has ordered a high-level investigation into the stampede at the Haj pilgrimage that left at least 717 dead and 863 injured on Thursday, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) said.
During a meeting of the Haj Higher Committee, which he chairs, the crown prince said the findings of the investigation will be submitted to Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman, “who will take appropriate measures” in response, SPA said.
Thursday’s tragedy comes on the heels of another one, in which 108 people were killed when a massive construction crane collapsed on Makkah’s Grand Mosque on September 11 as thousands were gathering for the Haj.
It has has become the second worst in a number of tragedies to strike the pilgrimage, surpassed only by a tunnel stampede in Mina on July 2, 1990, which killed 1,426 pilgrims, mostly from Asia.
Earlier Thursday, Health Minister Khaled Al-Faleh promised that there would be a rapid and transparent investigation of the stampede, which he blamed on undisciplined pilgrims not following instructions.

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Thursday's stampede second worst tragedy at Haj

• Death toll in Mina stampede rises to 717; over 850 injured


Bum move: Kardashian ‘kimono’ shapewear sparks Japan debate

Updated 33 min 20 sec ago
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Bum move: Kardashian ‘kimono’ shapewear sparks Japan debate

  • The pop culture icon unveiled the new ‘Kimono’ line on Twitter
  • But the announcement garnered mixed reaction both at home and in Japan

TOKYO: American television star Kim Kardashian has sparked debate in Japan by naming her new line of shapewear “Kimono,” prompting some to accuse her of disrespecting the traditional outfit.
The pop culture icon unveiled the new “Kimono” line on Twitter, revealing she had been working for a year on the underwear to offer “solutions for women that actually work.”
But the announcement garnered mixed reaction both at home and in Japan, with some offering their criticism on Twitter using the hashtag #KimOhNo.
“She’s been to Japan many times. I’m shocked. She has no respect,” tweeted one user in Japanese.
“I like Kim Kardashian, but please pick a name other than kimono if it’s underwear,” wrote another.
“The Japanese government should file a protest against Kardashian,” wrote a third.
Kimono literally means “something to wear,” while Kardashian’s use of it appeared to be a play on her first name. The new line’s website offered no explanation, and Kardashian has yet to respond to her online detractors.
And not everyone was opposed to the name, with some users arguing it could offer a chance to promote a traditional outfit that is declining in popularity even in Japan.
Once a standard of the Japanese wardrobe, the kimono is now often reserved for special occasions, such as weddings and coming-of-age ceremonies, and is mostly worn by women.
And while the elaborate outfits might appear to have little in common with the snug garb being offered by Kardashian, kimonos are not only often hugely expensive but known for being hard to wear.
Women frequently hire experts to dress them in kimono because the outfit requires seemingly endless nipping, tucking and strapping.