Iran, Morocco report highest death toll in Haj stampede

Updated 26 September 2015
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Iran, Morocco report highest death toll in Haj stampede

MINA: Twelve countries have claimed that their citizens were among the 719 pilgrims killed in Thursday’s Haj stampede in Mina, with Iran reporting 131 deaths.
Morocco had reported 87 dead, according to Moroccan media.
Saudi authorities have yet to provide a breakdown of the nationalities of the casualties.
The other countries that reported deaths among their pilgrims were Mali, 30; India, 14; Egypt, 8; Pakistan, 7; Senegal, 5; Turkey, 4; Algeria, Kenya and Indonesia, 3 each; and the Netherlands, 1.
A top Pakistani Haj official said 236 Pakistani pilgrims have remained missing after the stampede.
The Philippines reported six deaths, including one from the stampede and five from illness.
Egypt’s Religious Endowments Minister Mohammed Mokhtar Gomaa gave the state-run MENA news agency the death toll late Thursday night. He said another 30 Egyptians were injured.
On Twitter, Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj gave the death toll Friday and said 13 Indians were injured in the crush and stampede near Mina. She says Indian volunteers are aiding local officials.
Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has expressed condolences and called for better management of the Haj crowds to prevent future disasters.

Senegal’s President Macky Sall called for an assessment on the organization and conditions of the pilgrimage, and said national discussions would be held to better organize the people sent from Senegal.
The Haj has drawn some 2 million people from over 180 countries this year.

(With input from Agencies)


We have a story to share with the Saudi people, says new US official in Riyadh

Cultural and educational exchange programs between Saudi Arabia and the United States help build stronger ties. (AN photo)
Updated 19 September 2018
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We have a story to share with the Saudi people, says new US official in Riyadh

  • We have a story to tell and a story to share in Saudi Arabia with the Saudi people. We are pleased that so many Saudis want to study in the United States: US Public Affairs Counselor in KSA

RIYADH: Cultural and educational exchange programs between Saudi Arabia and the United States “help build stronger ties between the two countries and bring them closer together,” according to Brian Shott, the new US Public Affairs Counselor in Saudi Arabia.

Speaking at a reception to welcome him at the US embassy in Riyadh on September 18, he said: “One of the main things we do is we try to share aspects of the United States and of American culture, but we also learn from Saudis and Saudi culture.” 

In her opening speech, the embassy’s Deputy Chief of Mission Martina Strong also highlighted the enduring relationship between the two countries, saying: “Tonight is a celebration, a celebration of a friendship that has extended over many, many decades.”

Shott, who previously served in Morocco, Cairo and Baghdad, will be in Saudi Arabia for the next two years, during which he will promote educational and cultural exchanges.

“There are some real opportunities here and we have been fortunate enough to be able take advantage of partnerships with Saudi organizations and Saudi agencies, whether it is the General Authority for Culture or the Ministry of Education,” he said.

“We have a story to tell and a story to share in Saudi Arabia with the Saudi people. We are pleased that so many Saudis want to study in the United States.”

Meanwhile, the reception also served as a farewell to Robin Yeager, the cultural attache in Riyadh. She said that it had been a “very dynamic time to be in Saudi Arabia. It has been a pleasure and an honor to be here at a time when I get to know first-hand the future that Saudis are trying to build.”

The night that women were were given the right to drive, she said she went out and saw the “thrill on their faces.” To assist with empowerment and other progressive policies, embassy staff work on social issues and provide leadership training for women’s groups, she said.

“It is beautiful because they take something that an American expert talks to them about and they turn it into the Saudi way to approach it,” she added. “It’s not that we are changing things; it’s that we are giving them tools, so they can build what they want to build.”