5 Yemeni soldiers killed by Al-Qaeda

Updated 31 August 2014
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5 Yemeni soldiers killed by Al-Qaeda

ADEN: Suspected Al-Qaeda militants killed five Yemeni soldiers in two separate attacks Sunday, including a suicide car bombing, in the second day of deadly operations against the military, army sources said.
Three soldiers were killed in one attack when a suicide bomber rammed his vehicle against an army position in the southern Shabwa province town of Maifaa, one source told AFP.
Almost at the same time two other soldiers were killed in nearby Azzan village when Al-Qaeda suspects opened fire with automatic weapons at another military post, another army source said.
Witnesses said clashes erupted between the gunmen and soldiers after the Azzan attack.
Early Saturday a double attack, also including a suicide car bombing, targeted troops in southeast Yemen, leaving four soldiers dead. Ten Al-Qaeda suspects were also killed in an exchange of fire with soldiers at the Qatan army barracks in restive Hadramawt province.
Also on Saturday a police officer was killed outside his home by gunmen who fired from a motorbike, with a local official blaming Al-Qaeda for the drive-by shooting.


Letter to Qatar: Abandon PR, change attitude, and siege would be lifted

Updated 25 April 2018
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Letter to Qatar: Abandon PR, change attitude, and siege would be lifted

LONDON: Four Arab ambassadors have called on Qatar to improve relations with its neighbors, change its attitude and stop its support for extremism, terror and destabilization in the region.

The four ambassadors of Saudi Arabia (Mohammed bin Nawwa), Bahrain (Fawaz bin Mohammed Al-Khalifa), the UAE (Suleiman Al-Mazroui) and Egypt (Nasser Kamel) co-wrote a letter published on Wednesday in the Financial Times to answer an FT lead article titled “Qatar siege is meaningless.”

The ambassadors stressed in the letter that their governments had no plans to incorporate Qatar, as the FT claimed, but all they hoped for is that the Doha government committed to the international criteria to fight terrorism and “stop its support for terror and extremism in the region.”

In the letter, the four ambassadors reminded the paper that the prime minister of Qatar attended the wedding of the son of Abdel Rahman Al-Nueimi,who is listed on a US terror list, and is the main conduit to Al-Qaeda in Iraq where, according to the US, he funnelled millions of US dollars to the organization there.

The ambassadors added that Al-Nueimi is one of many sponsors of terror living and working in Qatar.

The ambassadors drew the readers’ attention to Qatar’s “double standard behavior” — saying one thing to the West, and doing the opposite.

They concluded the letter by demonstrating Qatar’s “duplicity.”

They said that Qatar has recently intensified the use of its media and PR to promote and support terror in the Middle East generally and in Saudi Arabia especially.

Recently Qatari broadcasters opened their airwaves to Houthi militia in Yemen and its propaganda calling for attacking Saudi Arabia.

In conclusion the ambassadors called on Doha to quit its public relations campaign and change its attitude — only then would the siege be over.