IS ‘police’ official beheaded

Updated 08 January 2015
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IS ‘police’ official beheaded

BEIRUT: A senior figure in Islamic State’s police force in Syria, which has carried out beheadings, was himself found decapitated in the eastern province of Deir Al-Zor, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Tuesday.
The man was an Egyptian national and was known as the deputy “emir” of the Al-Hesbah force in the province, the British-based Observatory said. His body, which showed signs of torture, was found near a power plant in Al-Mayadeen city, it said.
The message “This is evil, you Sheikh” was also found written on the corpse, which had a cigarette in its mouth. It was not clear who had carried out the beheading. Residents in areas controlled by Islamic State have said the group has banned smoking in public.
Unknown assailants also tried to kill two Islamic State militants in the city. The first attempt was when a car tried to run over a fighter near a roundabout. Another was hit by an attacker carrying a metal weapon and traveling by motorcycle, and was seriously wounded.
Residents and activists say IS has beheaded and stoned to death many people in areas it controls for being enemy fighters or for actions they see as violating Islamic law, such as adultery and blasphemy.


Algeria tensions: Governing party chief backs protesters

Updated 20 March 2019
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Algeria tensions: Governing party chief backs protesters

  • Moab Bouchareb told a meeting of party leaders that the party “supports the popular movement”

ALGIERS: The acting head of Algeria’s governing party says it is throwing its support behind protests against President Abdelaziz Bouteflika
Critics viewed the move Wednesday as an effort to save the reputation of the FLN party, or National Liberation Front, amid increasing disillusionment with Algeria’s power structure.
FLN interim leader Moab Bouchareb told a meeting of party leaders that the party “supports the popular movement.” But he also appeared to support Bouteflika’s “roadmap” for political reforms.
Bouchareb himself has been criticized as representing a leadership considered corrupt and out of touch with Algeria’s struggling youth. The FLN is Bouteflika’s party.
On Wednesday, foreign affairs minister Ramtane Lamamra said the Algerian government is “ready for dialogue” with demonstrators.
“As I see it, the demonstrations have only grown more numerous, and there will be no solution except through dialogue,” he said in a press conference in Berlin.
“The Algerian government is ready for dialogue, and beyond that, they are prepared to welcome the representatives of the opposition and civil society in the new government which is currently being formed.”
Algerian Prime Minister Noureddine Bedoui has been struggling to form a new government as candidates sought to keep their distance from Bouteflika. Bedoui, who was appointed last week, had promised to create a new cabinet within days to respond to the demands of Algeria’s demonstrating youth.
Separately, the Protestant Church of Algeria issued a statement supporting the protests. The Church, whose exact number of members is not precisely known in the largely Muslim country, said it “fully shares the aspirations and legitimate claims of the Algerian people.”
Algeria’s union for imams and the Islamic High Council, a consultative body, had previously expressed their support for the protests.
Protesters want the ailing Bouteflika to step down after 20 years in power. Bouteflika responded by abandoning plans for a fifth term and promising reforms, but also delayed presidential elections indefinitely.
Demonstrators have demanded the government quit at the technical end of its mandate in April, along with the president who has rarely been seen since a 2013 stroke.