Sadara sukuk oversubscribed 2.6 times

Updated 03 April 2013
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Sadara sukuk oversubscribed 2.6 times

Sadara Chemical Company (Sadara) announced the successful closing of the sukuk issued through its subsidiary Sadara Basic Services Company (SBSC). The sukuk has received strong investor demand, resulting in 2.6 times oversubscription based on the initial offering size of SR 5.25 billion. In keeping with this demand, Sadara has up-sized the issuance to SR 7.5 billion.
The sukuk have a floating rate and will have a tenor of approximately 16 years. The sukuk investors will receive an expected return of 6 month SAIBOR plus 95 basis points per annum, to be distributed semi-annually.
The net proceeds of the issue of the sukuk will be used to provide finance for, and procure the construction and delivery of, plants forming part of a chemicals complex located in Jubail Industrial City II in the Eastern Province.
SBSC is a joint stock company with commercial registration number 2055018374, established in Saudi Arabia for the purpose of issuing the sukuk on behalf of Sadara. It should be noted that the sukuk issuance was approved by the joint Shariah committee of Alinma Investment Company and AlBilad Investment Company, by the Shariah committee of Riyad Capital and the Shariah adviser of Deutsche Securities Saudi Arabia LLC.
Sadara has appointed AlBilad Investment Company, Alinma Investment Company, Deutsche Securities Saudi Arabia LLC and Riyad Capital as joint lead managers and joint book runners. The legal advisers to the joint lead managers are Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP, and Zeyad S. Khoshaim Law Firm in association with Allen & Overy LLP. In addition, the legal advisers to SBSC and Sadara are Waleed N. Al-Nuwaiser in association with White & Case LLP, and Hatem Abbas Ghazzawi & Co.
Established in October 2011, Sadara is a limited liability company developed by Saudi Arabian Oil Company and the Dow Chemical Company. Sadara is building a world-scale, fully integrated chemicals complex in Jubail Industrial City II, in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Once completed, the complex is expected to be one of the world’s largest integrated chemical facilities, and the largest ever built in a single phase. First production units are expected to come on line in the second half of 2015, with all production units coming on line in 2016.The sukuk prospectus was published on March 16.
“This press release is for information purposes only and does not constitute an invitation or offer to acquire, purchase or subscribe for securities,” a statement said.
The Capital Market Authority and the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul) take no responsibility for the contents of this announcement, make no representations as to its accuracy or completeness, and expressly disclaim any liability whatsoever for any loss arising from, or incurred in reliance upon, any part of this announcement.


Merkel seeks united front with China amid Trump trade fears

Updated 22 May 2018
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Merkel seeks united front with China amid Trump trade fears

  • Merkel seeks common ground to ward off trade war
  • Plans complicated by US policy moves

Chancellor Angela Merkel visits China on Thursday, seeking to close ranks with the world’s biggest exporting nation as US President Donald Trump shakes up explosive issues from trade to Iran’s nuclear deal.

Finding a common strategy to ward off a trade war and keep markets open will be Merkel’s priority when she meets with President Xi Jinping, as Washington brandishes the threat of imposing punitive tariffs on aluminum and steel imports.

“Both countries are in agreement that open markets and rules-based world trade are necessary. That’s the main focus of this trip,” Merkel’s spokeswoman Martina Fietz said in Berlin on Friday.

But closing ranks with Beijing against Washington risks being complicated by Saturday’s deal between China and the US to hold off tit-for-tat trade measures.

China’s economic health can only benefit Germany as the Asian giant is a big buyer of Made in Germany. But a deal between the US and China effectively leaves Berlin as the main target of Trump’s campaign against foreign imports that he claims harm US national security.

The US leader had already singled Germany out for criticism, saying it had “taken advantage” of the US by spending less than Washington on NATO.

Underlining what is at stake, French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire warned the US-China deal may come “at the expense of Europe if Europe is not capable of showing a firm hand.”

Nevertheless, Merkel can look to her carefully nurtured relationship with China over her 12 years as chancellor.

No Western leader has visited Beijing as often as Merkel, who will be undertaking her eleventh trip to the country.

In China, she is viewed not only as the main point of contact for Europe, but, crucially, also as a reliable interlocutor — an antithesis of the mercurial Trump.

Devoting her weekly podcast to her visit, Merkel stressed that Beijing and Berlin “are both committed to the rules of the WTO” (World Trade Organization) and want to “strengthen multilateralism.”

But she also underlined that she will press home Germany’s longstanding quest for reciprocity in market access as well as the respect of intellectual property.

Ahead of her visit, Beijing fired off a rare salvo of criticism.

China’s envoy to Germany, Shi Mingde, pointed to a “protectionist trend in Germany,” as he complained about toughened rules protecting German companies from foreign takeovers.

Only 0.3 percent of foreign investors in Germany stem from China while German firms have put in €80 billion in the Asian giant over the last three decades, he told Stuttgarter Nachrichten.

“Economic exchange cannot work as a one-way street,” he warned.

Meanwhile, looming over the battle on the trade front is another equally thorny issue — the historic Iran nuclear deal, which risks falling apart after Trump pulled the US out.

Tehran has demanded that Europe keeps the deal going by continuing economic cooperation, but the US has warned European firms of sanctions if they fail to pull out of Iran.

Merkel “hopes that China can help save the atomic deal that the US has unilaterally ditched,” said Die Welt daily.

“Because only the giant emerging economy can buy enough raw materials from Iran to give the Mullah regime an incentive to at least officially continue to not build a nuclear weapon.”