People told not to eat pesticide-laced locusts

Updated 04 April 2013

People told not to eat pesticide-laced locusts

The Ministry of Agriculture has warned citizens and residents against eating locusts found on the ground as they have been subject to heavy insecticide-spraying.
The ministry’s warning, which has appeared in various local media outlets, said eating locusts might expose humans to serious health hazards.
“Boiling or cooking the locusts for eating purposes will aggravate the adverse effects of the chemicals in the insecticides,” the ministry's announcement said.
Last month, agriculture experts predicted that swarms of desert locusts would migrate to various parts of the Kingdom at the end of March and the beginning of this month.
Adnan Al-Khan, director of the Jeddah-based Saudi Center for Locust Control and Research at the Ministry of Agriculture, said the desert locusts were expected to reach the north coast of Saudi Arabia and begin hatching there.
UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) experts said desert locusts originated in Sudan and gradually moved to the southern parts of Egypt. Air currents and spraying of pesticide by agricultural officials have deflected locust swarms to other parts of the Kingdom, they said.


First pilgrims leave under Eyab initiative

Updated 18 August 2019

First pilgrims leave under Eyab initiative

  • Al-Amoudi toured the exhibition dedicated to welcome Eyab’s beneficiaries

Saudi Minister of Transport and Chairman of the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA), Dr. Nabeel Al-Amoudi, oversaw the departure of the first 

group of pilgrims under the Eyab initiative on Saturday together with GACA President Abdulhadi bin Ahmed Al-Mansouri.

Eyab seeks to improve services provided to pilgrims, with the authority aiming to enrich pilgrims’ experience at the Kingdom’s airports. It is expected to benefit 30,000 pilgrims during this year’s Hajj season.

Al-Amoudi toured the exhibition dedicated to welcome Eyab’s beneficiaries, inspected the services available and received a briefing from the initiative’s officials.

GACA started an experimental implementation of Eyab this year, aimed at pilgrims returning to Indonesia, India and Malaysia through Jeddah’s King Abdul Aziz International Airport and Madinah’s Prince Mohammed bin Abdul Aziz Airport.