Protesters in Bangladesh rally against atheist bloggers

Updated 07 April 2013
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Protesters in Bangladesh rally against atheist bloggers

DHAKA: Hundreds of thousands of Jamaat-e-Islami supporters rallied in Dhaka yesterday after staging a “long march” to the Bangladeshi capital to demand the execution of atheist bloggers for allegedly defaming Islam.
It was the latest protest to rack Bangladesh, deepening tensions between secularists and the largest Islamic party, Jamaat-e-Islami, whose leaders are under trial for crimes committed during the country’s 1971 war of independence.
The radical group converged on Dhaka’s main commercial hub to protest against what they said were blasphemous writings by atheist bloggers, shouting “God is great — hang the atheist bloggers.”
They defied a pro-government national strike by secular protesters — who staged a smaller rival protest in Dhaka yesterday — aimed at foiling the radical’s group march.
“Around 200,000 people attended the rally,” Dhaka’s deputy police commissioner Sheikh Nazmul Alam said, while protest organizers put the number at over half a million.
Authorities said, meanwhile, two activists of the ruling secular Awami League had died in the last 24 hours in clashes with Jamaat-e-Islami demonstrators, bringing to 96 the number killed in violence linked to the war crimes trials.
Protest organizers called yesterday’s rally the “long march.” Many began traveling by foot on Friday from remote villages to Dhaka’s Motijheel area that became a sea of white skull caps and robes.
“I’ve come here to fight for Islam. We won’t allow any bloggers to blaspheme our religion and our beloved Prophet Muhammad,” said Shahidul Islam, an imam at a mosque outside Dhaka who walked 20 km.
Hefajat-e-Islam, another group supported by tens of thousands of seminaries, organized the rally in support of its 13-point demand that included enactment of a blasphemy law to execute atheist bloggers.
There has been vociferous debate between staunch atheists and fundamentalists in Bangladesh’s social media for years, but it took a deadly turn in February when an anti-Islam blogger was murdered.
Earlier in the week, four online writers were arrested on charges of hurting Islamic religious sentiments in a country where 90 percent of people are Muslims.
Following recent protests over the war crimes tribunal, the government has blocked a dozen websites and blogs to stem the unrest. It has also set up a panel, which includes intelligence chiefs, to monitor blasphemy on social media.
Under the country’s cyber laws, a blogger or Internet writer can face up to ten years in jail for defaming a religion.
Dhaka was virtually cut off from the rest of the country from Friday afternoon when secularists called a 22-hour nationwide strike to obstruct the march and private transport operators halted services fearing violence.
Islamists who could not take part in the march staged rallies in cities and towns across the country, with some 7,000 taking part in a protest in the port city of Chittagong, local police officer Nazrul Islam said.
Two Jamaat leaders have already been convicted by the tribunal, which critics accuse of fabricating charges as part of a government bid to settle political scores, rather than to deliver justice.


Vietnam arrests 2 former ministers suspected of mismanagement

Updated 32 min 24 sec ago
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Vietnam arrests 2 former ministers suspected of mismanagement

  • Vietnamese authorities toughen their crackdown on corruption
  • The People’s Supreme Procuracy approved prosecution orders against Truong Minh Tuan and his predecessor Nguyen Bac Son

HANOI, Vietnam: Vietnamese officials said Saturday that they have arrested two former information ministers suspected of mismanaging state investment capital, as the authorities toughen their crackdown on corruption.
The Ministry of Public Security said on its website that the People’s Supreme Procuracy approved prosecution orders against Truong Minh Tuan, former minister of information and communications, and his predecessor Nguyen Bac Son for “violating regulations on management and use of state investment capital causing serious consequences,” and that police were speeding up their investigation into the case. The offense carries a jail sentence of up to 20 years.
Son was information minister from 2011 to 2016 and Tuan held the post from 2016 until last year, when he was fired for mismanagement at state-owned Mobifone, one of Vietnam’s biggest mobile phone operators.
The ruling Communist Party’s Inspection Committee said earlier that it found Mobifone had overpaid to buy 95 percent of the shares of loss-making pay TV provider Audio Visual Global Joint Stock Company, in a deal worth nearly 8.9 trillion dong ($380 million).
Around 10 senior officials at the ministry and senior executives at Mobifone have been arrested for their alleged involvement in the case.
A former Politburo member and many other former or current officials have been jailed for corruption or economic-related crimes in the past few years.