Traditional handmade headbands set trend at Janadriyah festival

Updated 18 April 2013
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Traditional handmade headbands set trend at Janadriyah festival

Traditional handmade headbands have made a comeback in a big way at the ongoing Janadriyah National Festival for Heritage and Culture, where the bands are selling like hot cakes.
Traditional women’s headbands in various colors and adorned with exquisite ornaments have became a fashion trend as women and girls of all ages and nationalities are seen wearing them in the festival premises. As a result, their sales have risen dramatically.
Visitor Ebtisam Al-Ruwaily from the Kingdom’s Northern region said the headband is a key part of traditional women’s clothing and has been worn since the olden days.
It was usually made of a long black cloth decorated with gold or silver ornaments that women wore as head adornments on special occasions.
Um Abdullah from Arar said women used to wear headbands all the time, especially older ladies, The bands were sewn by hand and adorned with beads and gold and silvers coins, and were tied around the head like a bandana.
Another Janadriyah visitor, Um Rashid from Qassim, said that traditional headbands had been worn by women in Najd villages to carry water jar or crops on their heads, adding that it was occasionally embroidered with gold coins to be worn at wedding ceremonies.
Um Ghazi pointed out that the headbands were worn in the past to hold the hijab or ‘Shailah’ (traditional head covering) used by women all over the Kingdom, and it is believed to relieve headaches.
Leading the revival of the traditional headbands in the Janadriyah festival were young girls such as Abeer, Hanan and Rasha, whose heads were adorned with beautiful heritage headbands that expressed their pride to wear a traditional ornament associated with the Saudi culture.
One of the girls said that she wore the band because it is easy to wear and that it looks beautiful.


Mozart manuscript expected to sell for €500,000

Updated 18 June 2018
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Mozart manuscript expected to sell for €500,000

  • The 130,000 manuscripts and historical documents that Aristophil had its investors sink their savings into are now being dispersed in auctions over the next six years
  • The manuscripts are part of a vast sell-off by the French state of the collection amassed by the collapsed investment firm Aristophil

PARIS: The first draft of music Mozart wrote for the last act of his opera "The Marriage of Figaro" is expected to sell for half a million euros ($578,000) when it goes under the hammer in Paris.
The "exceptional" manuscript from 1786 which will be auctioned on Wednesday in the French capital comes from the peak of the composer's career in Vienna, the auction house Ader Nordmann said.
Called "Scena con Rondo", Mozart wrote the music initially as a recitative to be sung by Figaro's bride, Susanna, before rejecting it for the now legendary aria, "Deh vieni non tardar".
"These four pages are particularly important because they reveal Mozart at work, struggling to rethink a scene in the final act of the opera," expert Thierry Bodin told AFP.
It will be sold along with another Mozart manuscript, a fragment of a serenade to youth written by young Wolfgang Amadeus when he was only 17.
Probably commissioned by the "chancellor of Salzburg, who was a friend of the Mozart family, to mark the end of his son's studies," according to Bodin, it is expected to make between 120,000 and 150,000 euros.
The manuscripts are part of a vast sell-off by the French state of the collection amassed by the collapsed investment firm Aristophil.
It was shut down in scandal three years ago, taking 850 million euros ($1 billion) of its investors' money with it.
The 130,000 manuscripts and historical documents that Aristophil had its investors sink their savings into are now being dispersed in auctions over the next six years run by Ader Nordmann and three other French auction houses, Artcurial, Drouot Estimations and Aguttes.