Saudi student injured in Boston blasts doing well, says father

Updated 20 April 2013

Saudi student injured in Boston blasts doing well, says father

JEDDAH: The father of the 20-year-old Saudi student who was injured in the deadly Boston blasts has said his son was indeed questioned about the explosions but only as a routine procedure.
Ali Alharbi, speaking to Saudi media on Wednesday, said his son Abdurrahman was just one of more than hundreds people of various nationalities who were questioned by investigators looking into the blasts that killed three people and injured more than 170 others.
Abdurrahman was watching the Boston Marathon on April 16 when two bombs placed in trash bins exploded. He sustained injuries in the body.
Another Saudi, identified as Noura Al-Ajaji, was said to have sustained a slight injury and was declared out of danger.
On Wednesday, Alharbi tweeted on Abdurrahman's Twitter account and said his son was now out of danger and is receiving excellent care at the hospital where he is confined.
He also posted pictures for Abdurrahman, including one showing the student with the Saudi consul general in New York, Azzam Al Gain, during the official's visit at the hospital room.
Abdurrahman had been a hot topic among US media, with one article published by The New Yorker, titled The Saudi Marathon Man, questioning whether he was the victim of racial profiling.
Reports have it that while Abdurrahman was in hospital being treated for his wounds, a “phalanx” of officers and agents and K9 unit searched his apartment.
"What made them suspect him? He was running — so was everyone. The police reportedly thought he smelled like explosives; his wounds might have suggested why. He said something about thinking there would be a second bomb — as there was, and often is, to target responders.
"If that was the reason he gave for running, it was a sensible one. He asked if anyone was dead—a question people were screaming. And he was from Saudi Arabia, which is around where the logic stops. Was it just the way he looked, or did he, in the chaos, maybe call for God with a name that someone found strange?" said the article authored by Amy Davidson.


Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

Updated 21 August 2019

Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

  • The website of a cryptocurrency company is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal
  • The Singapore-based company uses the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree

JEDDAH: Fraudsters are trying to lure victims into investing in a “virtual currency” with false claims that it is linked to the Saudi riyal and will be used to finance key projects, the Saudi Ministry of Finance warned on Tuesday.

The website of a cryptocurrency company in Singapore is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal, using the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree. Its “ultimate goal” is to finance NEOM, the smart city and tourist destination being built in the north of the Kingdom, the company claims.

“Any use of the KSA name, national currency or national emblem by any entity for virtual or digital currencies marketing will be subject to legal action by the competent authorities in the Kingdom,” the ministry said on Tuesday.

The fraudsters were exploiting ignorance of how virtual currencies work, cryptocurrency expert Dr. Assad Rizq told Arab News.

“A lot of tricks can be played,” he said. “Some of these companies are not regulated, they have no assets, and even their prospectus is sometimes copied from other projects.

“They hype and pump their project so the price goes up. Inexpert investors, afraid of missing out, jump in, which spikes the price even higher. Then the owners sell up and make tons of money.

“Cryptocurrencies are a risky investment for two reasons. First, the sector is not yet fully regulated and a lot of projects use fake names and identities, such as countries’ names or flags, to manipulate investors.

“Second, you have to do your homework, learn about the technology. And if you still want to invest, consider your country’s rules and regulations.”