Breathable nail polish a hit with Muslim women

Updated 25 April 2013
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Breathable nail polish a hit with Muslim women

A “breathable” nail polish created as a less harmful alternative to regular nail varnish has become a surprise hit among Muslim women. The polish looks trendy, and — making it interesting to Muslim women — it is said to be halal (allowed by Islamic law) and provides no obstacle for women who want to complete their wudhu (ablution) before the daily prayers.
Nail polish is considered inconsistent with wudhu because of the physical layer it creates over the nails. This prevents water from cleansing the nails, which is a requirement for wudhu.
Therefore, a woman would have remove her nail polish every time she needs to renew her wudhu, which may mean removing and re-varnishing several times a day.
For this reason, some Muslim women put nail polish on after finishing the last prayer of the day before going out, and then take it off again before dawn prayers. Others simply refuse to go through the trouble of getting a manicure that won’t last long.
Inglot Cosmetics, the manufacturer of O2M Breathable Nail Enamel, claims that unlike the regular manicure which keeps oxygen and moisture from reaching the fingernail, Inglot’s nail polish was formulated to let both air and water through, hence making it a ‘wudhu-friendly’ nail polish. The product is made of a polymer found in contact lenses to achieve permeability.
A craze has built up around O2M nail polish after an Islamic scholar in the United States tested its permeability and published an article saying that, in his view, it complies with Islamic law.
“I love nail polish and I wish I could wear it on a regular basis,” said UAE-based Fatma. “This new polish is a huge breakthrough for me. We are supposed to cover up, but nowhere does it say ‘don’t be fashionable’.”
Aisha Ali, an employee at a real estate office, said she rushed out and bought the polish in its five available colors as soon as she heard about it.
College student Farhana Ali felt that Inglot just found a new way to circumvent the Islamic laws, even though some scholars approved it.
The mosque Noor Al-Islam’s Imam in Sharjah, Sheikh Ali Barakat, pointed out the conditions of validity of wudhu agreed by the majority of scholars. It is the removal of any substances that prevents water from reaching the body, he said. “If this product allows water to reach the nails then there is no harm in using it.”
Nevertheless, Fatima Al-Hamrani, Islamic law instructor, said that the product should be prohibited because it encourages women to manifest in finery.
“Any finery acts do not require a fatwa (Islamic legal judgment) to permit it,” said Shaikh Ahmad Al-Qubaisi, a prominent UAE Islamic scholar. “Whether it allows the passage of water or not, it is haram (forbidden by Islamic law). These inventions are circumventing the name of religion, and we should be aware of it, and more eager to implement the Sharia,” he said.


Rihanna under fire over ‘Moroccan Spice’ make-up

Rihanna launched Fenty Beauty in 2017 (top). (Getty Images )
Updated 19 July 2018
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Rihanna under fire over ‘Moroccan Spice’ make-up

DUBAI: Make-up mogul Rihanna is facing backlash on social media as detractors accuse her of cultural appropriation over the latest addition to her Fenty Beauty empire — an eyeshadow palette called “Moroccan Spice.”
Fenty Beauty, named 2017’s best innovation by Time Magazine, now offers a collection of 16 sultry eyeshadow shades with such names as “Fez up,” “Desert baked” and “Shisha smoke.”
The palette’s desert-themed campaign video features models posing next to a camel and Arab-influenced music playing in the background. However, some social media commenters have slammed the campaign over its apparent lack of any Moroccan models.
“As someone who is half Amazigh Moroccan, I (would have hoped that) if you (were) going to have a palette inspired by — or do the shoot in — Morocco, you could have at least cast one person of Moroccan or Amazigh descent,” one commenter posted on Twitter. The video was shot in the US, however.
“Moroccan Spice with no Moroccan models to represent it. If Rihanna was white, her brand would be tarnished from the backlash she’d receive for this Orientalist nonsense,” another user said.
The campaign photos — visible on Rihanna’s Instagram page — feature a variety of models, including the pop superstar herself, posing against sunburnt orange and pink backgrounds.
“I am actually very mad that Rihanna did not use a Moroccan model to be the face of her new palette,” one Twitter user said in response to the release of the palette, which was made available on July 6.
Some users jumped to the Barbadian star’s defense, however.
“Obviously Rihanna is not (going) to go looking for Moroccan models to market her Moroccan Spice campaign. Companies use aspects of a culture in ads without accurately representing that culture because it’s a marketing campaign,” one user posted on Twitter.
Rihanna, who is yet to address the online controversy, launched the beauty line in September, with a promise to make all women feel included.
“Fenty Beauty was created for everyone: For women of all shades, personalities, attitudes, cultures, and races. I wanted everyone to feel included, that’s the real reason I made this line,” she said at the time of the launch in 2017.
The singer and actress has been making headlines as of late, not least because of her starring role in female-driven crime caper “Ocean’s 8,” which struck box office gold in July.
She also garnered attention last week, when the star was spotted with her alleged Saudi beau, Hassan Jameel, lounging poolside in Mexico.
The reported couple, who caused a media whirlwind when news of their apparent relationship spread last year, were caught on camera in a series of photographs published in the Daily Mail.
While it remains to be seen whether the couple really are an item, Saudi make-up fans aren’t complaining and even took to social media to theorize that Rihanna’s much-reported-on launch of Fenty Beauty in Saudi Arabia in April was in part due to her desire to visit her potential future in-laws.
It was a joke that spread like wildfire on Twitter as users posted comments like: “She’s coming to visit her in-laws” and “Hassan Jameel did all the ladies a favor.”