Ushaiger restored to past glory

Updated 26 April 2013
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Ushaiger restored to past glory

Ushaiger, the small village in the northwest of Riyadh, has been restored to its former glory to preserve its heritage and revive ancient customs and lifestyles.
Visitors to Ushaiger, or “Najd’s Womb” as it is referred to by residents for having raised many well-known Islamic scholars and historians, will find a green oasis in the middle of the desert. It has mud houses, markets, mosques, narrow alleys surrounded by 600 orchards, 30 towers and 80 freshwater wells engraved hundreds of years ago.
All of this is in an area of no more than four square kilometers amid sand dunes, near Shaqra Province, 200 km northwest of the capital city. Ushaiger means "Small Blonde,” which is a description of the small sandy-brown mountain located north of the village. The village is on Al-Washim plain in the Najd region.
Ushaiger has over 400 mud houses and 25 mosques within seven districts with its narrow pathways that end at palm groves and orchards. It is surrounded by a thick wall that has wide doors made of ithal (tamarisk) wood and high massive towers. The doors are decorated with brandings of circles, disks and geometric designs, according to the Saudi Press Agency.
The ruins of Ushaiger were lovingly restored by a number of citizens who wanted to preserve their rich heritage and turn the village into an attractive tourist spot.
Ushaiger prides itself for producing several prominent men of letters including the renowned religious reformer Muhammed bin Abdul Wahab, Islamic scholar Sheikh Al-Othaimeen and many poets and thinkers.


Saudi tourism body considers funds for 6 tourism projects worth SR71 million

The funds will go toward developing a range of plans across the hospitality sector, including hotels, conference centers, infrastructure and tourist resorts. (SPA)
Updated 17 April 2019
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Saudi tourism body considers funds for 6 tourism projects worth SR71 million

  • Saudi Arabia’s vision on the tourism sector is based on its basic values and culture in the first place, followed by the economic importance and regional and international weight it enjoys

RIYADH: The Saudi Commission of Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) has announced plans to fund 33 new tourism projects across the Kingdom, as part of a lending initiative to aid the sector in underdeveloped Saudi regions.
Abdul Majid bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Nasser, the SCTH’s director general of tourism investment, said that the initiative, in partnership with the Ministry of Finance, approved proposals for 33 projects at a cost of more than SR1,100 billion ($294 million).
Al-Nasser added that a joint committee formed by the SCTH and the ministry was also studying funding for six other projects worth an additional SR71 million.
The funds will go toward developing a range of plans across the hospitality sector, including hotels, conference centers, infrastructure and tourist resorts. The hope is that, as well as highlighting the many attractions on offer in less-heralded parts of the country, the initiative will also lead to an upswing in job creation.
Saudi Arabia’s vision on the tourism sector is based on its basic values and culture in the first place, followed by the economic importance and regional and international weight it enjoys, as well as its value-based interaction with other communities.
Earlier this month, SCTH undertook registration of 1,127 artifacts and relics that it successfully managed to restore from America, in coordination with the Saudi Foreign Ministry. Some of the items recovered date back to prehistoric times.
The director-general of archiving and protecting antiquities at SCTH, Naif Al-Qannour, said the commission had stepped up its efforts to recover national treasures from inside and outside the Kingdom.
Al-Qannour added that many of the objects had been voluntarily handed over to the Kingdom by relatives of US citizens who worked in Saudi Arabia during the 1960s.