Call for setting up judicial body to protect female inheritance

Updated 12 May 2013
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Call for setting up judicial body to protect female inheritance

Female participants at a symposium entitled “Women, Commercial Inheritance and Family Rule” have called for “an independent body of a judicial nature” to protect their inheritance.
This body should distribute inheritance money amongst heirs according to Islamic law and should protect women against social pressure to give up their rights. They called for a distinction between “traditions, customs and wrongful social practice and judicial rulings.”
One of the participants emphasized “the protection of women’s rights by educating men and women about the importance of conducting a speedy inheritance inventory and not delaying the matter for years and decades.”
Aisha Al-Mana, a participant, said: “Denying women their inheritance is one of the main reasons behind family feuds.”
She categorized inheritance as one of the most sensitive issues in society because it is often confused with tribal tradition, adding that differentiating between heirs is a dangerous phenomenon because it overlooks women’s rights as stated in the Qur’an.
She said that many women are persuaded by their brothers to give up their rights as heirs. “Women from merchant or rich families are rarely given their full rights,” she added.
She called on scholars, intellectuals, lawyers and religious leaders to rectify this injustice. The courts are filled with thousands of cases related to inheritance disputes. She said that while this issue concerns society at large, it is an infringement on women’s rights in particular.
Al-Mana said it was unlawful to ask women to give up their right to inheritance, especially when it is done for traditional and tribal reasons.
President of Businesswomen Forum Princess Mashael bint Faisal bin Turki, praised the role of the forum.
“The forum focused on female participation in the national economy and placed special emphasis on its importance and the necessity to forge strategic women’s alliances. This is in addition to forging economic alliances and entities that can compete and succeed in the market place,” she said.
Princess Mashael said these ambitions are embodied in the establishment of the first female investment company, the Eastern Forum for Development. This company has 24 female shareholders who are members of the Businesswomen Forum. This company helps women build a financial and economic base and has an impressive presence in the region and the Kingdom.
The forum aims to concentrate on female issues that have a negative effect on women’s social and economic status and obstructs their participation in economic development of the Kingdom.
The forum aims to overcome regionalism and unify women’s efforts in the whole of Saudi Arabia through various seminars and initiatives in Riyadh and Jeddah.
The symposium includes a number of lectures. Abdul Aziz Al-Qasim gave a lecture entitled, “Commercial Inheritance in the Kingdom: Suggested Solutions.”
Hanan Al-Qahtani gave a lecture about “Women’s Actual Rights in Inheritance: Real Practices and Results.”
Dr. Ahlam Al-Awadi gave a lecture about “Distinction and Injustice in Inheritance.”
Dr. Amal Quray spoke of “Differences in Applying Shariah in Arab Countries in Relation to Family Rules.”


First Saudi female air traffic controllers begin work

Updated 22 March 2019
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First Saudi female air traffic controllers begin work

  • Eleven women completed a one-year program conducted by Saudi Air Navigation Services

JEDDAH: Saudi Air Navigation Services (SANS) on Wednesday celebrated the appointment and start of work of the first batch of Saudi female air traffic controllers at an air traffic control center in Jeddah.
Eleven women completed a one-year program conducted by SANS in cooperation with the Saudi Academy of Civil Aviation. This is the first program to qualify women to work as air traffic controllers.
The academy initiative, in collaboration with SANS, seeks to create more jobs for women as part of a reform push to wean the economy off oil. Vision 2030 plan aims to increase employment and diversify revenue sources.
Earlier, SANS CEO Ryyan Tarabzoni said the state-owned company was prioritizing the hiring of women in the profession, as the country pushes to extend women’s rights in the country and also recruit more nationals as part of the “Saudization” project.